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    I found this forum because I haven't been fishing since I was a kid, and had a general question. I recently went to Scheels and Bass Pro Shops and had seen that there was an overwhelming amount of lures available, how do I choose? I understand its all personal preference, I plan on doing just general all around fishing (if there is such a thing). I don't plan on fishing for anything in particular, I just want to get out there and enjoy the outdoors. Is there some sort of lure review website or something like that? Any help is appreciated, thanks.

    #2
    Welcome to the forum!

    The first place you might start is the beginners corner on this very website: https://www.nefga.org/forum/nefga-pr...ners-corner-aa

    The species of fish that you pursue will be a pretty big difference type of lures that you purchase. For general fishing at most Nebraska waters I would recommend looking at the sections for bluegill, crappie, and bass. And don't overlook catfish too... but I would guess there are less lures and more baits there.

    Also - feel free to post questions in the fishing forum. People are usually more then happy to share some ideas!

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      #3
      Half a dozen road runners, and you could catch just about any fish species in the state.

      One thing that tackle companies to very well, is lure in the consumer. Most anglers will agree that they catch about 90% of their fish on 10% of their tackle. Finding that 10% is another story.

      Welcome!

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        #4
        Originally posted by ericein View Post
        Welcome to the forum!

        The first place you might start is the beginners corner on this very website: https://www.nefga.org/forum/nefga-pr...ners-corner-aa

        The species of fish that you pursue will be a pretty big difference type of lures that you purchase. For general fishing at most Nebraska waters I would recommend looking at the sections for bluegill, crappie, and bass. And don't overlook catfish too... but I would guess there are less lures and more baits there.

        Also - feel free to post questions in the fishing forum. People are usually more then happy to share some ideas!
        Thank you very much ericein.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Jthod View Post
          Half a dozen road runners, and you could catch just about any fish species in the state.

          One thing that tackle companies to very well, is lure in the consumer. Most anglers will agree that they catch about 90% of their fish on 10% of their tackle. Finding that 10% is another story.

          Welcome!
          In the spring/summer/fall I pretty much only fly fish... and catch about 70% of my fish on the same three fly patterns!

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            #6
            But I bet you still have a dozen fly boxes filled with all kinds of other patterns

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              #7
              I do... I carry 5 boxes at any given time!

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                #8
                Here's another question, is it worth it (my time/effort) to purchase a closed face rod/reel combo as a starter or should I just go for the open face? I was at Scheels and had the Ugly Stik GX2 rod/reel combo in my hands but didn't get it for whatever reason.

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                  #9
                  I prefer an open face reel spinning reel, but if you have kids I think a closed face is easier for them to use.

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                    #10
                    I would also recommend a spinning reel. As Jthod mentioned, Roadrunners are a great multi-species lures, Mepps are great too. I'm no expert on panfish baits, so I won't give any recommendations on those. If you are looking for some basic bass gear that you could throw on a spinning rod I'll make few suggestions. Soft plastics are always good, I'd look at some stick baits like Senkos or Yum Dingers, also a soft jerk bait like a fluke. They are both pretty versatile and easy to use. Squarebill crankbaits are also pretty versatile and you could probably throw the smaller ones on a light rod. Spinnerbaits are also great, but you will have to stick with fairly small ones if you are using a light rod.
                    There is nothing wrong with keeping it simple and using a night crawler under a bobber or off the bottom. If you have any more lure questions just ask!

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                      #11
                      Let me offer a comment, and you might think this is no help at all, but hopefully it will begin to help you make sense of all the baits and lures, rods and reels. . . .

                      THEY ARE ALL JUST TOOLS! And the trick is picking the right tool for the job. Every one of those baits and lures you saw in Scheel's and Bass Pro Shops will catch fish if used in the right place at the right time. There are some that are good "all-around" choices that will work in a variety of situations and catch a variety of species, and yes, personal preference and "favorites" does play a part, but you will not get me to make a single recommendation because it all depends--depends on where you are fishing, for which species, at what time, etc., etc.

                      Pick baits based on two main factors: First how deep are the fish, how deep do you need to fish? If the fish are sitting in 15 feet of water, you probably ain't gonna catch anything on a bait that only fishes 1 foot deep. Secondly, how fast do you need to fish? Active fish can generally be caught on faster presentations and faster presentations will cover more water putting your bait in front of more active fish. But when they are inactive, you might have to slow down, even glacially-slow to tempt a bite.

                      Use that framework to begin to make sense of it all; after you get the basics of depth and speed right, then you can fine tune sizes, shapes, colors, etc.

                      Having said that, based upon what you said, jigs come in an infinite variety of sizes, styles, body types, etc. You can catch anything that swims on jigs. I would recommend a variety of jigs from 1/32 oz. on up to maybe as large as 1/2 oz., get a variety of plastic bodies to put on those jigs, and a few floats (i.e. "bobbers"). Then worry about learning how to fish the jigs.

                      Daryl B.
                      Daryl Bauer
                      Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
                      Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
                      daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
                      http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

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