Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do they calculate the %-lean hamburger meat?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Question: How do they calculate the %-lean hamburger meat?

    So this applies to things like venison, beef, etc...

    When you go to the grocery store (for example) and the package says "90% lean ground beef," what do they mean by that?

    Do they mean that for every 9 pounds of lean meat, they throw in a pound of fat?

    Or does it mean that the meat they throw straight into the grinder has a content of 10% fat and somehow they know this?

    #2
    A quick google search shows that there are a number of machines and chemical analysis processes that determine the ratio. So I assume that is what meat packers/butchers use.

    Comment


      #3
      Your example above is pretty much right on. 90% is 9 lbs meat per 1 pound fat. Mix together and ran through the grinder.
      Any color will work, as long as it is green pumpkin. - Roland Martin.

      Comment


        #4
        There are actually several ways to determine fat content in raw ground products. The oldest method is using a sausage square which tells you if you have X amount of lean trimmings at X lean point then you need X amount of fat trimmings at X lean point to achieve the target. Keep in mind in beef trim production that there has to be at least 12% visible lean for the component to be classified as beef trimmings. There is a chemical test that is ran in a lab called either extract where an either based chemical is used to extract the fat from the finished product and then through a weight calculation the fat lean ratio is determined. There is also a machine called a food scan that uses infrared and x-ray to measure fat content in finished ground beef production. And lastly there is some relatively new technology out there called a meat master that continually analyzes fat content in product that is conveyed through an x-ray tunnel and gets the average lean value of a determined batch size.
        SUCESS IS WHEN PREPARATION MEETS OPPORTUNITY!!

        Comment


          #5
          The easiest thing to do is grind pure meat...venison, elk, goose, whatever, and then do just what you said...for a 90/10 mix, grind in a pound of fat for every 9 lbs. of meat. Just make sure you mix it well. Otherwise you might have one package of 50/50, and one of 95/5.

          when mixed properly though, I have found this to be the easiest way.

          Also, get a good scale before you do it, and either weigh the meat in a meat tray, or put plastic wrap on the scale first....it helps keep things clean.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by huntrfish View Post
            The easiest thing to do is grind pure meat...venison, elk, goose, whatever, and then do just what you said...for a 90/10 mix, grind in a pound of fat for every 9 lbs. of meat. Just make sure you mix it well. Otherwise you might have one package of 50/50, and one of 95/5.

            when mixed properly though, I have found this to be the easiest way.

            Also, get a good scale before you do it, and either weigh the meat in a meat tray, or put plastic wrap on the scale first....it helps keep things clean.
            So the consensus seems to be that this is how you do wild game. I agree and it seems to make sense. This is how I always thought it was done.

            I'm curious now: Is it done this way with beef in the grocery store? (Previous responses indicate otherwise...)

            Comment

            Working...
            X