Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Smoked Goose and Duck

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Smoked Goose and Duck

    Hope y'all enjoy.

    #2
    That looks tasty!
    I encourage you to try this recipe if you haven't yet! This is the 3rd year I have done it on goose, and it turns out awesome. Sliced thin it's killer on a sandwich, or on crackers with some cheese. The key is to pluck (pain in the butt, but totally worth it!) and smoke it sloowwww. Took some to a superbowl party and it was the first tray of snacks to be empty! I don't do the scotch, but follow the rest of the recipe and it works great.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	51155477_10213391405362337_2953955768908382208_o.jpg
Views:	165
Size:	104.0 KB
ID:	1223995
    Ingredients
    • Skin-on breasts from 1 large goose, about 2 pounds
    • 44 grams of kosher salt, about 4 tablespoons
    • 3 grams of Instacure No. 1, about 1/2 teaspoon
    • 25 grams sugar, about 2 tablespoons
    • 4 grams crushed juniper, about 1 tablespoon
    • 10 grams freshly ground black pepper, about 1 tablespoon
    • 1/2 cup peaty Scotch whisky (optional)

    Instructions
    1. If you are using the Scotch, put the goose breasts in a bowl and coat them with the whisky. Put them into a closed container just about large enough to hold them and refrigerate overnight.
    2. The next day, mix all the remaining ingredients in a bowl. Drain the goose breasts, or just pat them dry if you have not done the Scotch soak. Massage the spice mixture into the meat, making sure every bit of the goose is covered. Put the goose breasts into a closed container that just barely fits the meat. Pour in any excess salt/spice mixture, cover and refrigerate for 3 to 4 days. Every day during the curing process, turn the goose breasts over so they are evenly coated.
    3. When the meat has cured, it will be dark red and slightly firm to the touch throughout. Rinse it off briefly under cold running water and pat it dry. Let the meat sit out in a cool place for 2 to 4 hours, preferably with some sort of breeze or fan on it. Or you can leave it to dry in the fridge uncovered overnight.
    4. Truss the meat as you would a roast, or stuff it into sausage netting. If you do the netting, wear an apron, as you will need to manhandle the goose breast into the netting. Take your time and do it little by little. Tie off the ends of the string or netting, leaving enough at the end with the most fat -- this should be the thick end of the breast -- to hang. You want the fattiest part of the goose breast at the top, so the fat can drip down and keep the meat moist.
    5. Hang the breasts in an unheated smoker and smoke over beech, alder, oak or cherry wood. Apple is a good substitute, too. Start the smoke cold and gradually bring the temperature up. Your goal is to have the thickest part of the goose breast reach 140°F to 150°F by the end of cooking. Move the goose breasts out of the smoker and allow to return to room temperature before refrigerating.
    6. The smoked goose will last 10 days in the fridge, or a year if well sealed and frozen.

    If you are using the Scotch, put the goose breasts in a bowl and coat them with the whisky. Put them into a closed container just about large enough to hold them and refrigerate overnight. The next day, mix all the remaining ingredients in a bowl. Drain the goose breasts, or just pat them dry if you have not done the Scotch soak. Massage the spice mixture into the meat, making sure every bit of the goose is covered. Put the goose breasts into a closed container that just barely fits the meat. Pour in any excess salt/spice mixture, cover and refrigerate for 3 to 4 days. Every day during the curing process, turn the goose breasts over so they are evenly coated. When the meat has cured, it will be dark red and slightly firm to the touch throughout. Rinse it off briefly under cold running water and pat it dry. Let the meat sit out in a cool place for 2 to 4 hours, preferably with some sort of breeze or fan on it. Or you can leave it to dry in the fridge uncovered overnight. Truss the meat as you would a roast, or stuff it into sausage netting. If you do the netting, wear an apron, as you will need to manhandle the goose breast into the netting. Take your time and do it little by little. Tie off the ends of the string or netting, leaving enough at the end with the most fat -- this should be the thick end of the breast -- to hang. You want the fattiest part of the goose breast at the top, so the fat can drip down and keep the meat moist. Hang the breasts in a cold smoker and smoke over beech, alder, oak or cherry wood. Apple is a good substitute, too. Start the smoke cold and gradually bring the temperature up. Your goal is to have the thickest part of the goose breast reach 140°F to 150°F by the end of cooking. Move the goose breasts out of the smoker and allow to return to room temperature before refrigerating. The smoked goose will last 10 days in the fridge, or a year if well sealed and frozen.
    A man never stands so tall as when he stoops to help a child fish.....

    Comment


    • Huskermut
      Huskermut commented
      Editing a comment
      That looks tasty!
Working...
X