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Cooking snack sticks

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    #16
    I buy the Ultra Source online, they have a website. They are geared more to commercial operations but sell to individuals. They also have a store front in Kansas City, but I have never tried that option.

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      #17
      Commercial meat, poultry, fish & seafood, Jerky and snack stick seasonings to add spice and flavor to your food including wild game, snack stick, meat stick and jerky products.

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        #18
        Thanks guys, I made some sticks this past weekend and they turned out well. I tried the LEM backwoods and they were a little too salty for my liking but other than that turned out well.

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          #19
          Learn about the top 5 mistakes made when making homemade snack sticks!


          Hey guys, it’s Jon from Meatgistics and today we are going to show you 5 common mistakes that people make when they are making homemade snack sticks. Snacksticks are a great treat and a fun way to try some great seasonings as long as you are making them correctly! No one wants to put in all the time and effort into making a batch of snack sticks just to have an easily avoidable error ruin your batch! Read this article for the top 5 most common issues people run into when making snack sticks! …#3 will shock you!!!

          #1 You are not using a Binder! The term Binder can be a bit misleading, yes it’s main function is to help the product bind together but it does much more than that. A more accurate description of what it does is increases your margin of error for a few of these steps! For example, how long you mix and grind your meat are extremely important when making snack sticks because you need the correct amount of protein extraction, if you miss it by a little bit then your texture and taste are going to be off, well you can extend that margin of error by adding a low cost binder like carrot fiber! That is not all binders do of course, they also give you more room for error in the smokehouse, make stuffing easier and they increase your final yield, meaning more snack sticks for the family to enjoy! For a few dollars a package adding a binder is a really great way to make sure you are making a better product. Have you ever had your casing separate from your meat during the cooking process? That is probably because you did not get enough protein extraction during the mixing phase and a binder can help with that!

          # 2 You are not using Smoked Meat Stabilizer with wild game. Snack sticks can be made out of almost any meatblock but you can’t treat an all beef or pork snack stick the same as one you are making out of a deer you got last weekend! If you are using any type of wild game like venison, elk, moose, etc. you need to be using smoked meat stabilizer. Smoked Meat Stabilizer is a cure accelerator that helps kill many common bacteria found in meat processing but especially in wild game! This makes your product safer and also helps to preserve the smoked flavor after packaging.

          # 3 Your meat Block is too Lean! if you are making homemade snack sticks you want a fat percentage of 20% or more. The fat acts as a vehicle for the seasoning and coats your mouth and tongue with the taste allowing you to get more of the flavor and allowing it to linger longer. Fat also gives the snack stick a more pleasing texture and prevents it from drying up. Fat gets demonized by a lot of people because they associate the fat we eat with the fat on our bodies. Now, I am not saying you should switch to an all bacon and sausage diet but fat is essential to keeping our bodies running properly and it is going to give you a better all around product.

          # 4 You are cooking your snack sticks too quickly. If you start cooking at a higher temperature, you risk creating a tough and dry exterior and casing, sometimes known as case hardening. This can cause an issue because once the outside of the stick has cooked it will no longer efficiently transfer heat to the center of the stick, leaving you with an overdone exterior and an under-cooked interior. Case hardening basically makes it hard to fully cook the product up to a safe temp, and it does not allow moisture to escape as easily and in a semi-dried product like snack sticks part of our goal is to dry the product out (to an extent, but not as dry as something like jerky). A slow and incremental increase in your smoker temps will help the meat temp rise at a rate that will help prevent case hardening, while still creating a safe and consumable product when finished. Within 2 hours we are setting the smokehouse temp up to a high enough temp to really get the meat up into a temperature range that will begin killing bacteria, and that should be within a sufficient enough time to not be a concern.

          # 5 You are either over or under stuffing your casings. If you have ever had your casings pop or burst during the cooking process there is a good chance you are overstuffing your casings. If you normally end up with an extremely wrinkly product then their is a good chance you are understuffing your casings. With anything you are going to link like sausages it is better to understuff than to overstuff as you can always twist them a few more times to tighten them up, but you can not do that with a snack stick. It will take some practice but finding the correct stuffing proportions will help you with the appearance of your product and the ease of cooking.

          So there are 5 very common mistakes people make when making snack sticks! If you have questions on what might be causing a specific problem for you leave us a comment and we will get back to you, or you can always follow me on here and send me a private chat if you’d prefer to not post your question so everyone can see it!

          See more top 10 grills under 200$
          Knowing which grill is right for you can be hard to figure out and that is why we have created this list of the best grills under $200.

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            #20
            Frisco in Omaha has some great seasonings,and awesome prices. I went to a smoking classing a couple of years ago, that they put on once a year around rifle deer season. It's about a free class, and they making sticks, summer sausage, brats. They have a sign up sheet at the front desk, but sure you can call tthem.

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              #21
              I like to mix my own seasonings. Google around and find some seasoning mix recipes and adjust to your liking. I like more black pepper than most commercial mixes have and less sweet. That way I know exactly what's in it too.
              Mike - LaVista, NE

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