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    pond building

    My uncle is in the process of building his pond. Any advice would be appreciated or any websites you guys would reccomend reading?

    Its 14ft now but found a guy who can dig it to 24ft. Is there such a thing as too deep for a small pond about 1.5 acres?

    #2
    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/fishing/guides/pondguide/

    Lots of info in the link above. Take caution not to punch through a layer of soil that will end up draining the pond during excavation.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Ty S View Post
      My uncle is in the process of building his pond. Any advice would be appreciated or any websites you guys would reccomend reading?

      Its 14ft now but found a guy who can dig it to 24ft. Is there such a thing as too deep for a small pond about 1.5 acres?
      I don't know that you can go "too deep". A buddy of mine renovated his pond about 6 years ago. There is some drainage into it on the upper end and he was amazed how much the pond has silted in since then (we checked depths with electronics when it was frozen over).

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        #4
        bowhunt nailed it, its rare, but sometimes you can get below good material and succept the pond to seepage. I take it its a dug-out and not an impoundment?

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          #5
          Originally posted by bowhunt5 View Post
          Take caution not to punch through a layer of soil that will end up draining the pond during excavation.
          +1

          A friend dug his pond too deep and it would not hold water. He had to put a liner in, which was a very expensive fix.

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            #6
            It will be lined with bentonite. Banks with gravel and sand. Plus he is hooking it up to his well pump for his sprinkler system. Also is thinking of one of the windmill pond aerators

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              #7
              He lives in a very low ground water area

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                #8
                Originally posted by GregK View Post
                I don't know that you can go "too deep". A buddy of mine renovated his pond about 6 years ago. There is some drainage into it on the upper end and he was amazed how much the pond has silted in since then (we checked depths with electronics when it was frozen over).
                Besides other problems that have already been noted, you absolutely can go "too deep".

                Deep, small bodies of water, pits and ponds, in Nebraska are the most likely waterbodies to stratify during the summer. When they do that, all of that deep water is pretty much devoid of oxygen and all aquatic life during the summer, including fish. It is not unusual to see Nebraska pits stratify at 8 or even 6 feet of depth during the summer and the rest of the water deeper than that ain't got nothing in it.

                Recommendations like you will see in the pond guide will be a minimum of at least 10 feet of water over a quarter of the pond's area. If that deep water was only as deep as about 15 feet I would consider that to be "ideal" for most pits and ponds in Nebraska.

                You bet sedimentation and filling will occur in the pit or pond over time; all bodies of water fill with sediment and organic materials as they age. "A lake is a reflection of its watershed" and water bodies that have watersheds with a lot of row crops will silt in a lot faster than watersheds with native grass and other natural ground cover. If possible, it is best to plan to catch that sedimentation in a silt/retention pond above the main pond or even construct a pond with a means of doing occasional drainings where excessive sedimentation can be removed. Siltation on most pits usually occurs at a much slower rate and is not a problem.

                Daryl B.
                Daryl Bauer
                Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
                Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
                [email protected]
                http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

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                  #9
                  Its native grasses for about 10 acres around it.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Ty S View Post
                    Its native grasses for about 10 acres around it.
                    Is that the entire watershed?

                    If so, that is excellent!

                    Daryl B.
                    Daryl Bauer
                    Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
                    Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
                    [email protected]
                    http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

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                      #11
                      Yea its a low lying area just north of norfolk. Very sandy soil. Housing development going in. He owns a nice chunk of it. Wants to manage it for bass. Will be privately stocked from the fish farm in wayne.

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                        #12
                        I have the Nebraska pond management book from ngpc alot of great information in it!

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                          #13
                          Keep the sides shallow enough to allow for aquatic vegetation growth and you'll have plenty of good hiding spots for both predator fish and prey species. It makes a healthier habitat than steep sides and no veg.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by Ty S View Post
                            Also is thinking of one of the windmill pond aerators
                            A windmill aerator is better than none, but it will also not do the job when you really need it to. Dead hot summer with zero wind.



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