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  • whitetips
    replied
    Originally posted by Lizcote View Post
    We are thinking of building a pond on our 5 acre lot, can anyone tell me the steps of building one? Do we need a permit? We live in Lancaster county and just want a small pond for recreation and wildlife. Can anyone help us by giving us answers on where and how to start?
    I would start by referring to our Pond Management Guide Series. You can find it HERE.

    In particular, see the chapter on Pond Construction.

    Daryl B.

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  • Lizcote
    replied
    We are thinking of building a pond on our 5 acre lot, can anyone tell me the steps of building one? Do we need a permit? We live in Lancaster county and just want a small pond for recreation and wildlife. Can anyone help us by giving us answers on where and how to start?

    Leave a comment:


  • teehjaeh57
    replied
    Hey Lip Em - what did you end up doing? I have a 3 acre pond, and several micro ponds with both warm water and cool water species fisheries and manage several other private ponds around Lincoln - might be able to show you things we're working on. Pretty fun - posted Master Angler Wiper, Smallmouth, Yellow Perch, Redear and Bluegill sunfish from one 3 acre lake this year, plus a 4# Walleye. If you're willing to manage the fishery, and other parameters are in place, you can achieve some pretty cool outside the box goals. Feel free to ping me - I have also been working with a great excavation and engineering company building ponds around Lincoln and can put you in touch with them. Built a pond for me and Josh in the past six months - both drum tight and under budget.

    Leave a comment:


  • whitetips
    replied
    Originally posted by Lip'em View Post
    I completely understand what your saying about the size of pond in that watershed. Thats why I went to the nrcs first. I'm just kind of torn between putting a 6 acre lake in a waterway that has mostly crop runoff that might be dirty year around and a 2 acre pond in an area that I can control water clarity. If I do go the route with the 6 acre pond I just didn't want to wait 5 years or so. Also I want to make sure I not spending 70,000-100,000 dollars (nrcs guestimate) to building a pond that will always be dirty. Trust me I don't think there sticking there nose in my business, I need them to stick there nose in my business to make sure this is done right the first time.

    I agree with you on the walleye. I just thought it would be more of a bonus to catch one here and there. As to the yellow perch, I have a buddy that put them in a pond about 2 acres and they are doing suprisingly well(2 miles west of Lincoln). I've caught them anywhere from 6 inches to 12 inches. The only kind of fish in there is Wiper and Yellow Perch. My question here is he pumps the pond every so often with a well, does that have anything to do with there longevity? Is a yellow perch considered prey or predator?
    You can have some walleye in small waters, pits and ponds, as long as you know that they likely will be just an incidental, bonus catch. As a somewhat "anal", pointy-headed fisheries biologist, I am always reminding folks that the best habitats for walleyes, the habitats where walleyes thrive, are large bodies of water--large rivers, large natural lakes and large reservoirs. Walleyes can survive in other habitats but I want folks to have the right expectations for those smaller bodies of water--they ain't gonna have a lot of walleyes, but sure, they might occasionally catch a walleye and maybe even a big walleye.

    If your buddy puts some well water into his pond on occasion, that might make it a better habitat for yellow perch. Yellow perch are a cool-water species and waters in southern and eastern Nebraska just are not as good for yellow perch as waters in northern and western Nebraska. If you have a pond with some supply of cooler water and with some aquatic vegetation, then yes, you might be able to have some yellow perch. But even then I would not expect the yellow perch to do as well in that habitat as bluegills or crappies. And, we are finding that largemouth bass really like to eat yellow perch in pits and ponds. I suspect that if your buddy has wipers and yellow perch in his 2-acre pond, eventually the wipers are going to be eating yellow perch too. Wipers are definitely predators and if yellow perch are the only small fish in that pond, well, the wipers are going to eat yellow perch.

    Like many species of fish, yellow perch are both predators and prey. They eat a variety of aquatic insects, leeches, crayfish, and other small fish and in some cases yellow perch can be significant predators of other small fish. At the same time, yellow perch are utilized as prey by a number of larger predator fish, walleyes, northern pike, largemouth bass and others all like to eat yellow perch. They are both predator and prey, and what you think they are might depend on your perspective--if you were a midge larvae on the bottom of the pond you would see yellow perch as a predator, but if you were a wiper in the same pond, you would see yellow perch as a tasty prey item.

    I know you are looking at a lot of different options and trying to make the decision that is best for you--Good Luck and feel free to ask me any other questions that I might be able to help with.

    Daryl Bauer
    Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
    Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
    [email protected]
    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/...d-backlashes//

    Leave a comment:


  • Lip'em
    replied
    Originally posted by whitetips View Post
    First of all, the folks who have told you what they did about the size of the pond and the "red tape" etc., have told you those things for a reason. It is not just the "gubberment" trying to stick their nose into your business. You should seriously consider their recommendations.

    Secondly, there is all kinds of advice here, http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/fishin...de/default.asp . Take some time, do some reading.

    A football field is roughly an acre if that give you some perspective on estimating size.

    Small ponds with large watersheds are not the best idea, and that is the reason some of the things that have been recommended to you have been recommended. You asked what you could expect for water quality with mostly "crop run off"? My best answer to that is "a lake is a reflection of its watershed".

    What to stock in a 2-acre pond? Follow the K.I.S.S. principle--you ain't gonna have enough water with enough habitat diversity to stock many species. The more species you stock the more likely you will have a little bit of everything and a whole lot of nothing. Two acres ain't even close to being big enough water to support a healthy population of walleyes. In addition unless the pond was in northern or western Nebraska I would not think about yellow perch either. There is a reason that most small waters in Nebraska are stocked with largemouth bass, bluegills and channel catfish--those species are well-adapted to those small waters and we know they can produce quality fishing in small waters. There are other species that can work, but the chances of them working are not as good as largemouth bass, bluegill and channel catfish and it may take more intensive management efforts to make other species work. The largemouth bass, bluegills and channel catfish can be stocked and left on their own and do quite well.

    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/fishin...de/default.asp

    Daryl Bauer
    Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
    Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
    [email protected]
    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/...nd-backlashes/
    I completely understand what your saying about the size of pond in that watershed. Thats why I went to the nrcs first. I'm just kind of torn between putting a 6 acre lake in a waterway that has mostly crop runoff that might be dirty year around and a 2 acre pond in an area that I can control water clarity. If I do go the route with the 6 acre pond I just didn't want to wait 5 years or so. Also I want to make sure I not spending 70,000-100,000 dollars (nrcs guestimate) to building a pond that will always be dirty. Trust me I don't think there sticking there nose in my business, I need them to stick there nose in my business to make sure this is done right the first time.

    I agree with you on the walleye. I just thought it would be more of a bonus to catch one here and there. As to the yellow perch, I have a buddy that put them in a pond about 2 acres and they are doing suprisingly well(2 miles west of Lincoln). I've caught them anywhere from 6 inches to 12 inches. The only kind of fish in there is Wiper and Yellow Perch. My question here is he pumps the pond every so often with a well, does that have anything to do with there longevity? Is a yellow perch considered prey or predator?

    Leave a comment:


  • whitetips
    replied
    First of all, the folks who have told you what they did about the size of the pond and the "red tape" etc., have told you those things for a reason. It is not just the "gubberment" trying to stick their nose into your business. You should seriously consider their recommendations.

    Secondly, there is all kinds of advice here, http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/fishin...de/default.asp . Take some time, do some reading.

    A football field is roughly an acre if that give you some perspective on estimating size.

    Small ponds with large watersheds are not the best idea, and that is the reason some of the things that have been recommended to you have been recommended. You asked what you could expect for water quality with mostly "crop run off"? My best answer to that is "a lake is a reflection of its watershed".

    What to stock in a 2-acre pond? Follow the K.I.S.S. principle--you ain't gonna have enough water with enough habitat diversity to stock many species. The more species you stock the more likely you will have a little bit of everything and a whole lot of nothing. Two acres ain't even close to being big enough water to support a healthy population of walleyes. In addition unless the pond was in northern or western Nebraska I would not think about yellow perch either. There is a reason that most small waters in Nebraska are stocked with largemouth bass, bluegills and channel catfish--those species are well-adapted to those small waters and we know they can produce quality fishing in small waters. There are other species that can work, but the chances of them working are not as good as largemouth bass, bluegill and channel catfish and it may take more intensive management efforts to make other species work. The largemouth bass, bluegills and channel catfish can be stocked and left on their own and do quite well.

    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/fishin...de/default.asp

    Daryl Bauer
    Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
    Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
    [email protected]
    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/...nd-backlashes/

    Leave a comment:


  • Shorty
    replied
    Lip'em

    I don't know if you have seen this or not but here is NGPC pond book on line, lots of very usefull information. Jeff Blaser, the Private Waters Specialist is a good guy to talk to.
    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/fishin...management.asp

    Here is the chapter on pond construction.
    http://outdoornebraska.ne.gov/Fishin...ndChapter1.pdf
    Last edited by Shorty; 10-15-2012, 08:02 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shorty
    replied
    Originally posted by Lip'em View Post
    Hey shorty I seen your pond on here. Being only a 1/4 acre did you have to get permits or get it approved from anyone? Also is there a reason to go 20 ft deep?
    I left that up to my dirt contractor but this was an existing pond that just needed to have the silt dug out of it and some trees removed so I would guess there were no permits or approval from anyone. Deeper is better as ponds do silt in over time.
    Last edited by Shorty; 10-15-2012, 07:16 AM.

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  • Shorty
    replied
    Originally posted by Lip'em View Post
    Not sure what a 2 acre lake looks like. Is there any ponds around Lincoln that are roughly 2 acres?
    Try this for mapping out acres.

    http://www.acme.com/planimeter/

    Leave a comment:


  • Lip'em
    replied
    Hey shorty I seen your pond on here. Being only a 1/4 acre did you have to get permits or get it approved from anyone? Also is there a reason to go 20 ft deep?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lip'em
    replied
    Not sure what a 2 acre lake looks like. Is there any ponds around Lincoln that are roughly 2 acres?

    Leave a comment:


  • Shorty
    replied
    Originally posted by Lip'em View Post
    Another question I have is if I only go with a 2 acre lake would walleye, yellow perch, bluegill and smb survive? If not what combination would you recommend? Fish I would want would be:walleye, yellow perch, bluegill (or hybrid), smb, lmb or any suggestions? I would like something different than the usual bluegill, lmb and catfish.
    Bluegill and SMB usually don't mix well together but might be OK with enough walleye numbers present, redear sunfish have a lower reproductive rate and would be a better choice. The issue is adequately keeping BG young of year the in check so they don't stunt. Hybrid bluegill also might work as large majority are males. Here is a good article on smallmouth bass stocking combos.

    http://www.sdstate.edu/nrm/outreach/...l-Aug-2004.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • Lip'em
    replied
    Originally posted by Omaha View Post
    They suggested 6 acres due to the watershed I assume? What is the reason you only want 3 acres? Cost? Crop fields draining into your pond can be an issue, but if done right at the beginning, and maintained, don't have to be an issue. Creating generous amounts of thick grassy buffer around the pond to help stock sediments is a good first step.
    Yes 6 acres because of the watershed. The issue I have is the crop runoff is on other landowners land. I just don't think I could get a good enough buffer between them. How wide of a buffer are you talking? Have you or anyone you know dealt with the DNR? If so is it easy working with them?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lip'em
    replied
    That would be great if I could do two 3 acre ponds but the way the land lays I don't think it would be money well spent because the water way is pretty wide at the point of the first dam. The first dam would be about 200-300 yards long. I could be wrong though. I like your idea of making 2 or three ponds to keep sediment out. Would building a wing dike (like wagon train) help with water clarity or just sediment? There is another area that I could build a pond that only has about 30 acres of water shed. I just don't know if that is enough water. I could add a well if needed. The smallest pond I would like to have is about 2 acres. Another question I have is if I only go with a 2 acre lake would walleye, yellow perch, bluegill and smb survive? If not what combination would you recommend? Fish I would want would be:walleye, yellow perch, bluegill (or hybrid), smb, lmb or any suggestions? I would like something different than the usual bluegill, lmb and catfish.
    Last edited by Lip'em; 10-14-2012, 05:51 PM.

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  • Shorty
    replied
    Why not two 3 acre ponds or a series of smaller ponds with the upper pond also acting as sediment trap?

    A large water shed will be a concern for keeping sediment out. My recollection is that in eastern Nebraska 10-20 acres of water shed per surface acre of pond should be sufficient to keep it full. 300 acres of water shed feeding a 3 acre pond would be overkill. A good 3 inch gully washer would likely overwhelm a pond that small.
    Last edited by Shorty; 10-14-2012, 03:28 PM.

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