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    stocking a pond?

    My friend said I could stock his pond this spring with what ever kind of fish I want. Thinking of Bass and Bluegill. They only problem is there is a bunch of bullhead in there. Would a guy need to get those out of there so the bass and bluegill could do well. If so what is a good way to get rid of those bullheads. Thanks for any help!

    #2
    Originally posted by MBennett View Post
    My friend said I could stock his pond this spring with what ever kind of fish I want. Thinking of Bass and Bluegill. They only problem is there is a bunch of bullhead in there. Would a guy need to get those out of there so the bass and bluegill could do well. If so what is a good way to get rid of those bullheads. Thanks for any help!
    How many bullheads? How big? How old is the pond? What is the water clarity like?

    Daryl B.
    Daryl Bauer
    Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
    Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
    daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
    http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

    Comment


      #3
      not sure how many bullheads, he claims there are a lot. Its about 3 acres and deepest spot 10 ft. Unsure of water clarity. Pond is 15 years old. Thanks for your help!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by MBennett View Post
        not sure how many bullheads, he claims there are a lot. Its about 3 acres and deepest spot 10 ft. Unsure of water clarity. Pond is 15 years old. Thanks for your help!
        If there are a lot of little bullheads, so many that they keep the water turbid, your best bet is to eliminate them, kill 'em all, and then re-stock probably with bluegills and largemouth bass.

        That would probably be the easiest way to get to a desirable fishery regardless of how many bullheads are there already.

        Start with some "homework":

        http://outdoornebraska.gov/wp-conten...h_Stocking.pdf

        http://outdoornebraska.gov/wp-conten...sh_Species.pdf

        And a whole lot more here, http://outdoornebraska.gov/privatewatersprogram/.

        If you have more questions, just ask!

        Daryl B.
        Daryl Bauer
        Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
        Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
        daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
        http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by whitetips View Post

          If there are a lot of little bullheads, so many that they keep the water turbid, your best bet is to eliminate them, kill 'em all, and then re-stock probably with bluegills and largemouth bass.

          That would probably be the easiest way to get to a desirable fishery regardless of how many bullheads are there already.

          Start with some "homework":

          http://outdoornebraska.gov/wp-conten...h_Stocking.pdf

          http://outdoornebraska.gov/wp-conten...sh_Species.pdf

          And a whole lot more here, http://outdoornebraska.gov/privatewatersprogram/.

          If you have more questions, just ask!

          Daryl B.

          Thanks for all the info Daryl

          Mitch

          Comment


            #6
            Mitch if you are wanting to know how to determine water clarity I can help describe that to you. Also if you need anymore advice on stocking this pond let me know. A bass bluegill fishery would be a great way to go. As Daryl said eliminating the bullhead would likely be the best option but there are other variables to that can determine what is the best action for your budget. I could help right up a plan for the pond if you'd like. Message me if you'd like more info.

            Brett
            Brett Kleinschmit
            Antelope Creek Wildlife and Ponds
            605-660-6566
            brett_antelopecreek@live.com
            www.antelopecreekwp.com

            Comment


              #7
              Where is the pond located? I will come take care of the bullhead population

              Comment


                #8
                As Daryl said, killing the pond is the best option. A lot of pond owners don't want to take that route, however, even though it's the best option. Eliminating a bullhead heavy pond is tough. You'll need to be patient and possibly creative. Are you able to draw down the pond at all? Or run a seine net through any of it? Bullheads can be trapped easily, but you'll have to place numerous traps and check them often, like every other day or so. Another thing to try is walking the shoreline in early summer. Daryl could confirm the time of year bullheads spawn, but I believe it's late spring/early summer. You'll sometimes see large schools of newly hatched bullheads and you can generally net these out pretty easily. So that could basically account for hundreds of removed undesirable fish.

                Also, once you have made a significant dent in the bullhead population, you may find you don't need to stock any additional fish at all. A lot of people automatically think adding fish fixes an issue. Of course, fish sellers like to sell fish, so it's often their suggestion. You likely do have a population of bluegill and largemouth, though they're unable to adequately compete with the large numbers of bullheads. For what it's worth, largemouth love bullheads. Obviously they eat a ton of bluegills, the two species were made for each other, but other than them and yellow perch, I bet bullheads are near the top of their list of preferences. Largemouth will eventually become your best management tool in keeping the bullheads knocked back. If you do find you need to add largemouth, I'd try to get a hold of as large of fish as possible. This can be expensive, but they'll target those remaining bullheads the minute you put them in. Either way, you need to assess the populations of all three species (bullheads, largemouth, bluegill) before stocking anything. You could end up with a whole different set of problems if you don't.
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                Get all your pond questions answered by the experts at Pond Boss!

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                  #9
                  Oh, to add. I would accept Antelope Creek's offer to come have a look and draft up a management strategy for you. Having an expert get his eyes on it is extremely valuable. Most don't realize that until they see the results.
                  NEFGA is endorsed by Pond Boss

                  Get all your pond questions answered by the experts at Pond Boss!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Omaha View Post
                    As Daryl said, killing the pond is the best option. A lot of pond owners don't want to take that route, however, even though it's the best option. Eliminating a bullhead heavy pond is tough. You'll need to be patient and possibly creative. Are you able to draw down the pond at all? Or run a seine net through any of it? Bullheads can be trapped easily, but you'll have to place numerous traps and check them often, like every other day or so. Another thing to try is walking the shoreline in early summer. Daryl could confirm the time of year bullheads spawn, but I believe it's late spring/early summer. You'll sometimes see large schools of newly hatched bullheads and you can generally net these out pretty easily. So that could basically account for hundreds of removed undesirable fish.

                    Also, once you have made a significant dent in the bullhead population, you may find you don't need to stock any additional fish at all. A lot of people automatically think adding fish fixes an issue. Of course, fish sellers like to sell fish, so it's often their suggestion. You likely do have a population of bluegill and largemouth, though they're unable to adequately compete with the large numbers of bullheads. For what it's worth, largemouth love bullheads. Obviously they eat a ton of bluegills, the two species were made for each other, but other than them and yellow perch, I bet bullheads are near the top of their list of preferences. Largemouth will eventually become your best management tool in keeping the bullheads knocked back. If you do find you need to add largemouth, I'd try to get a hold of as large of fish as possible. This can be expensive, but they'll target those remaining bullheads the minute you put them in. Either way, you need to assess the populations of all three species (bullheads, largemouth, bluegill) before stocking anything. You could end up with a whole different set of problems if you don't.
                    Thanks for the info,the only fish in there are bullheads. We have been netting them out of there,

                    Thanks
                    mitch

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