Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Question

    I am curious what some opinions may be on here. I have a friend who had an old oxbow which he dug out. Prior to being deepened the lake would freeze solid throughout the winter so there were not any fish at the beginning of this project. There are three "holes" approximately two of which are 8 ft and one is 10 ft and is the largest of the three. I would estimate that these make up 35-40% of the total 1.5 acres. The remainder is the old narrow channel which is 2-3 ft in depth. He also installed three aerators. Three years ago he introduced about 500 bluegill ranging from fingerling to 4" and fathead minnows. Two years ago he put in 100 bass and 30 crappie. After release, he has seen one fish, which was one dead bluegill the day following release. Other than that, nada. Many people have tried to fish, and nobody has caught a single game fish. The interesting thing is that the fatheads are thick as thieves. THEY. ARE. EVERYWHERE. I set some minnow/fish traps to see what I could find, and the results were ridiculous. On top of that, the frogs, water insects and snails are also doing very well. There is also a good amount of aquatic vegetation. Is it safe to assume that with the abundance of easy prey/cover that the fish are simply hard to catch? Considering this pond is literally in their back yard wouldn't you think that SOMEBODY would have seen one swimming, surface or chasing? I have left messages with the people recommended in other posts and am anxious to hear their response as well as yours.

    #2
    Originally posted by Navin Johnson View Post
    I am curious what some opinions may be on here. I have a friend who had an old oxbow which he dug out. Prior to being deepened the lake would freeze solid throughout the winter so there were not any fish at the beginning of this project. There are three "holes" approximately two of which are 8 ft and one is 10 ft and is the largest of the three. I would estimate that these make up 35-40% of the total 1.5 acres. The remainder is the old narrow channel which is 2-3 ft in depth. He also installed three aerators. Three years ago he introduced about 500 bluegill ranging from fingerling to 4" and fathead minnows. Two years ago he put in 100 bass and 30 crappie. After release, he has seen one fish, which was one dead bluegill the day following release. Other than that, nada. Many people have tried to fish, and nobody has caught a single game fish. The interesting thing is that the fatheads are thick as thieves. THEY. ARE. EVERYWHERE. I set some minnow/fish traps to see what I could find, and the results were ridiculous. On top of that, the frogs, water insects and snails are also doing very well. There is also a good amount of aquatic vegetation. Is it safe to assume that with the abundance of easy prey/cover that the fish are simply hard to catch? Considering this pond is literally in their back yard wouldn't you think that SOMEBODY would have seen one swimming, surface or chasing? I have left messages with the people recommended in other posts and am anxious to hear their response as well as yours.
    If the fish were there, you would know, they ain't that hard to catch. Particularly in the presence of largemouth bass, the fathead minnows would be gone and you would see frogs, but not all over the place. From what you have described, I would suspect that there are not many fish in there other than fathead minnows. If that is the case, re-stocking may be in order, however; if the original stockings disappeared, it would be nice to know why before dumping more fish in there.

    Assuming this pond is in Nebraska, you might contact our private waters specialist and see what he says. You can find contact information for Jeff Blaser here, Private Waters Program.

    One other comment, we do not recommend stocking fathead minnows in a new pond or a pond that has no fish. In that situation you want to get the bluegills off to as good of a start as possible, they will be the prey base for years to come. All fathead minnows do in that situation is compete with the small bluegills, and in the long term fathead minnows will not persist in the presence of largemouth bass.

    Hope that helps,

    Daryl B.
    Daryl Bauer
    Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
    Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
    daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
    http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

    Comment

    Working...
    X