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Licorice Long Fellers

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    Opinions Needed Licorice Long Fellers

    Anyone know anything about these? Found them (empty) while cleaning a house and they piqued my curiosity.

    Fishing trips aren't measured in pounds and inches; they're measured in smiles, laughter, and memories with friends and family.

    #2
    I am curious too. Tried to get the info from the company website, but without a upc, or product code no luck. Obviously the box is from before codes existed. So I will watch the post to see if anyone has a clue. If not I will call them Monday and post what I find.
    Keep it safe! JDL

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      #3
      Candy coated licorice? Sounds like a bigger version of Good & Plenty

      Found this on Wikipedia:
      Ferrara Pan Candy[edit]

      Main article: Ferrara Candy Company
      The company lasted until the third generation of the Ferrara family before being sold. The founder, the grandfather, Salvatore Ferrara, came from Nola, Italy to New York in 1899 at the age of 15. The Ferrara family had been bakers in Italy. In 1908 he opened a bakery at 772 W. Taylor, in the heart of Chicago's "Little Italy" neighborhood. He sold candy-coated almonds known as "confetti" (also known as Jordan almonds), a popular treat at Italian weddings. When candy sales became greater than pastries, Ferrara partnered with two brothers-in-law, Salvatore Buffardi and Anello Pagano. They built a two-story brick building at 2200 W. Taylor and began producing a variety of panned candies.

      The second floor of the building was devoted to the revolving kettles that produced the pan candy, with all of the machines being driven by a giant wheel. The candy was dropped to the shipping department below through a hole in the floor.

      Nello Ferrara, the second generation of the family in the business, served as a military attorney and was involved with the war crimes trials in Japan in 1946. It was his visit to that devastated country that inspired the creation of Atomic Fireballs in 1954. 15 million are consumed weekly.

      The company moved to a former dairy in Forest Park in 1959 where it remains to this day.

      Salvatore II, the third generation, provided the inspiration for the Lemonhead name when his grandfather, Salvatore Ferrara saw his baby grandson after delivery. Salvatore II was a forceps baby and he noted that his new grandson's head was lemon-shaped. Lemonhead candies were introduced in 1962. Ferrara now makes 500 million Lemonheads per year.[82]

      With the success of Lemonheads, the company expanded the fruit candy line with Cherry Chan, packaged in a box with a picture of an mustachioed, sinister-looking Asian. Alexander the Grape and Mister Melon soon followed. Bowing to some protest, and to create a common naming convention for the similar products, the names were changed: to Cherryheads, Grapeheads, and Melonheads, respectively.[83][84]

      In addition to the above products, Ferrara also produced Jawbreakers, Boston Baked Beans, Red Hots (cinnamon imperials), Long Fellers (panned licorice pieces), Gr-r-r-oats, and a minty chewing gum called Try-umph.[83]
      " A brave man likes the feel of nature on his face, Jack." - Wang Chi

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        #4
        Ok finally got to talk to a representative, very nice. She could not find anything more than I have. She is forwarding it to their research department and will get back to me sometime next week.
        Keep it safe! JDL

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          #5
          Originally posted by Jayomaha View Post
          Ok finally got to talk to a representative, very nice. She could not find anything more than I have. She is forwarding it to their research department and will get back to me sometime next week.
          Keep it safe! JDL
          You have gone above and beyond, thank you!
          Fishing trips aren't measured in pounds and inches; they're measured in smiles, laughter, and memories with friends and family.

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