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1959 Duracraft - Restoration/Conversion Project

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    1959 Duracraft - Restoration/Conversion Project





    I'm going to start restoring my "new" boat here in the next week or two. I wanted to post this up so I can show the progress I make and to leave a medium for suggestion from everyone here!

    Overall, I paid $450.00 for the boat and want to budget no more that an additional $500.00 (to provide a nice challenge as well). I'll see if I can stick to the limit !

    What are some additions that you have made on your boat that has made you life a little easier? (i.e. pole holders, drink holders, foots rests, etc)?

    The first start of my project was rewiring the trolling motor on the front end, which I accomplished today. The guy who owned it apparently didn't realize that one of the positive wires came loose in the foot-pedal assembly (which connects to the batter).

    During this week, I'm going to borrow or rent a power washer to clean the boat inside and out and take the motor over to a mechanic to get it looked at (has been sitting around for 2~ years). My assumption is that it needs to be thoroughly cleaned out and tuned up.

    After I get the boat prepped, I'm going to leak test the boat, JP weld and leaks, and pick up some "rhino" lining (or an alternative brand) to coat the interior and exterior of the boat.

    So far, I've got quite a bit of work ahead of me, but atleast it will keep me busy during the winter!!!

    Items Purchased So Far
    Tools:
    Rivet Tool (Plus Rivets - many variou sizes)
    Cheap 3" Paint Brushes (Used for laying on stripper)
    Wire Brush Attachments (for drill)
    Wire Brushes (Hard to reach spots)

    Supplies:
    Acetone
    Paint Stripper (5 Layer Stripper)
    JB weld (for previous rivets)
    Non-Abrassive Disposable Gloves
    Face Mask
    Scrap wood from menards ("pallet spacers" - 49 cents per, any size!)

    "Future Purchase List":
    Random Orbit Sander (80-180 grit sanding paper)
    Buffer
    Zinc Chromate Primer

    Current Cost:
    Boat: $450.00
    Supplies(Including Tools): $150
    Total: $600.00

    Time Spent:
    5 Hours
    **Note: This is my first project and the boat is 54 years old, so I will be learning throughout the process. I'm in no hurry. Properly prepping aluminum to hold paint is very, very important.**
    Last edited by jdspringr07; 10-30-2013, 05:03 PM. Reason: Changed Title

    #2
    Keep us updated, would like to see how it goes for you.

    Comment


      #3
      I'm going to start taking pictures. I have completely gutted out all of the old wiring, components, and wood that was inside the boat. Once I have removed the trolling motor (need to get some metric sockets), I'm going to go pick up some 4x4 so I can flip it upside down in the garage.

      I did a leak test on the boat today and only had about 4 small leaks, but since I'm going to investing a lot of time into this project, I'm going to go through an JB weld all rivets, joints, and seams on the underside of the boat prior to sanding the bottom down and repainting it.

      Question : Has anyone ever rhino lined the bottom of their boat? From looking around, I haven't seen many people do it as they say it causes a lot of drag which I'm sure might be the case. I didn't see an opinion, however, from someone that has actually done it. I wonder if the little drag would be worth it for sealing off the bottom of my boat for good.

      Comment


        #4
        Wouldn't just rhino lining the inside accomplish the same thing?


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
        "The finest gift you can give to any fisherman is to put a good fish back, and who knows if the fish that you caught isn't someone else's gift to you?" ~ Lee Wulff

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jdspringr07 View Post
          Question : Has anyone ever rhino lined the bottom of their boat? From looking around, I haven't seen many people do it as they say it causes a lot of drag which I'm sure might be the case. I didn't see an opinion, however, from someone that has actually done it. I wonder if the little drag would be worth it for sealing off the bottom of my boat for good.
          As Done mentioned, I think you could do the inside of it too. But it would probably add some weight to the boat. Maybe 40-50 pounds?

          Comment


            #6
            Done - it would, but I want to protect the outside as well, so I have been considering a polyurea coating to protect it from rust and abrassions.

            I plan on coating the inside as well, then using pour foam to fill the little ribs on the bottom before I start framing in a deck.

            Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I547 using Tapatalk

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              #7
              Had enough time today to clean up all of the rivets in the back and seal them off.

              I also practiced around with pain thinner and wire brush attachment on a panel near the transom.

              Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I547 using Tapatalk

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jdspringr07 View Post
                Done - it would, but I want to protect the outside as well, so I have been considering a polyurea coating to protect it from rust and abrassions.

                I plan on coating the inside as well, then using pour foam to fill the little ribs on the bottom before I start framing in a deck.

                Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I547 using Tapatalk
                A marine grade primer/paint will keep it from oxidizing on the outside once you are down to bare metal. Aluminum won't rust though. M_wink:

                My first boat was similar to yours. I put in a wood floor that I coated with fiberglass resin to protect it. The floor added a lot of stability to it.

                Just remember the defination of the word boat: An object surrounded by water that you dump money into.
                Break
                Out
                Another
                Thousand

                Good luck.
                When you have the option, please buy American made. If it does not save your job, it might save mine.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Fish On View Post
                  A marine grade primer/paint will keep it from oxidizing on the outside once you are down to bare metal. Aluminum won't rust though. M_wink:

                  My first boat was similar to yours. I put in a wood floor that I coated with fiberglass resin to protect it. The floor added a lot of stability to it.

                  Just remember the defination of the word boat: An object surrounded by water that you dump money into.
                  Break
                  Out
                  Another
                  Thousand

                  Good luck.
                  Haha, yeah. I just spent $150 today buying some tools (torch, rivet tool ,etc), primer, acetone, and other various items. So far so good though.

                  I've been watching videos on how to fiber coat wood and I'm looking into doing that. I've also got a neighbor that owns a full metal fabrication shop, so bolting in an aluminum frame seems like a decent option as well, but I'm a good way from that point yet !

                  I just used a 5 layer painter stripper and still have spots that I need to re-strip. I guess that happens when you pickup a boat that was made in 1959 lol!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Anyone experienced in transom repair -- in particular, the transom on an aluminum hull? I think I might have to cut out the rear section of aluminum to replace the old rotting transom mount, but I'd prefer to get the opinion of someone who has gone through it before.

                    I've been looking for videos on youtube for quite some time now, but it looks like most people have either had an I/O motor (with a fiberglass hull) or have an easy to access transom mount.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Finished sanding the back end of the boat:

                      Start stripping the paint off the left side:
                      Last edited by jdspringr07; 10-30-2013, 05:01 PM.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I spent roughly 2 hours today finishing up sanding the back and starting to strip the leftside of the boat.
                        Last edited by jdspringr07; 10-30-2013, 05:02 PM.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Done View Post
                          Wouldn't just rhino lining the inside accomplish the same thing?
                          It will seal off the inside, but since I'm already stripping all the paint off the boat -- I want to fill up all of the rivets, joints, etc. In case the rhino liner doesn't stick completely (which I'm trying to avoid), I want everything to already be sealed up.

                          Comment


                            #14


                            The top picture is of the right side of the boat. I have stripped most of the paint on the upper hull and I'm going through with a wire brush to clean off any remaining debree and to add an abrassive surfaced for when I apply my zinc primer.

                            Note: If you intend to do similar, cough up the extra cash a buy the Aircraft Stripper from an automotive parts store. It has done a tremendous job on stripping off 54 years worth of paint.

                            Additionally, it is very helpful if you either own, rent, or borrow a power washer. It is very useful in stripping off some of the remaining paint from the sides and cleaning off some of the stripper. Also, make sure to lay down a surface that doesn't break down with stripper and a little bit of news paper on top to absorb some of the material.

                            The lower picture is of my mounted transom.
                            Last edited by jdspringr07; 10-31-2013, 06:04 PM.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Be careful what brand of bedliner you use. There is a big quality difference between what Linex or Rhino Liner sprays and what you can buy from local jobbers. Adhesion and durability are the big deal and if it starts to peel it's game over. Where it sticks it really sticks and where it doesn't??? It will add a lot of weight to your boat as well. Just sayin'.
                              "Buster here wants to fish"

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