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    Need advice on installing privacy fence

    Well got the next 7 days off straight and was thinking about putting in a privacy fence out back. I am looking at using treated wood opposed the the expense of the pvc. Also am heading to Menards to check price on buying the wood separate and biulding my fence or if the panels are the way to go. I do believe my yard isnt completely level so Im thinking the pickets may be the way to go but not sure of price wise if its worth all the extra time.

    Well im heading outsite to set my corner post this afternoon so if anyone has any type of advice at all its much appreciated.

    THanks guys.

    TY

    #2
    first make sure you have a post hole digger, or rent a powered auger. The rental is way worth it in my opinion. What I have always done is when setting a post, I dig the hole and then put the post in, pour in the concrete mix DRY, this allows the post to stand on its own and is very easy to level it. Pour the dry concrete around the post as you would if it were wet. What happens is the concrete will soak up the moisture in the ground and set on its own. The nice part about this way is you dont have to mess with waiting for the mix to dry and trying to level it and so on. You can run the hose and get a little down around the mix to help with the speed of it getting the moisture it needs.

    Using this method, I have put the post in and put the boards up in the same day, rather than having to wait for a mix to dry.

    My father did this also and his fence is still standing strong after 20 years.
    Gotta go to the store and get some bactine. Raccoons make horrible pillows.

    Comment


      #3
      The only other things I would add are get out the phone book. Some of those big box store types aren't always the best price in town. They're not always the best quality in town either. The last privacy fence my inlaws put from one of the big box stores now has a full box of screws holding it together because it was literally falling apart after a few years. Screws vs nails makes a big difference on thos plank privacy fence.

      Make some calls on pricing too. A buddy of mine needed a new water heater this past Saturday. Called all the box stores in Lincoln. Found one with the same warranty/gal. etc. right at home for about $50 less at Sears. Turns out the local Ace hardware beat the big boys price as well and we didn't nead to burn $4 gas on a 70+ mile round trip.

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        #4
        Thanks guys. Well I did call around and Menards had the best price in town on 10ft treated 4x4s. Also did the math and basically to do it picket by picket is more expensive than buying the panels. So Im thinking the panels is the way to go. The guy that helped me told me I also had to figure in how much more beer would be drank doing it picket by picket and I had never thought of that into the cost.

        Tomorrow Im renting a power auger on the front of a skid loader. Hoping it will tear thru some smaller roots I keep running into in the few holes I dug by hand. Also found out I need to dig the holes at least 42" to be at ground frost code. hmmm That wouldnt be fun digging 19 holes that deep. WOW


        Any other advice is appreciated. Thanks peeps!

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          #5
          Another option to setting the posts in cement is to use pea gravel. My fence was blown down this spring. It turns out every post was set in cement (below grade!! :zbangingHead and I was stuck with digging out 15 huge cement chunks. If you use gravel instead of cement, the posts will never end up sitting in a pool of water...
          " A brave man likes the feel of nature on his face, Jack." - Wang Chi

          Comment


            #6
            Did you call the diggers hotline to come out and locate everything? It's always nice to know where everything is at before you start digging.

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              #7
              :aayeahthat:

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by livnlrn View Post
                Did you call the diggers hotline to come out and locate everything? It's always nice to know where everything is at before you start digging.

                Oh yea! Ive done this a couple times in the past few years. I know pretty much where everything is now. Thats a very good tip though.

                Well today I set the end and corner posts and dug all the holes with a 2 man power auger. Took me about an hour to do 19 holes! Id be there until tommorow without renting that for $30.

                Another question is should I have the concrete level with the ground to the top? Basically fill the hole half way with dirt then top it off with the crete?

                Thanks guys.

                Comment


                  #9
                  generally you want a little concrete above ground level and create a little dome. That way water will not sit against the post and rot it.
                  Gotta go to the store and get some bactine. Raccoons make horrible pillows.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    read something interesting online today. Most sites say that in hard freezing areas (US!) that you want the concrete on the bottom of the post and about a foot of dirt on top. This prevents the post from working out of the ground during the hard freeze of winter. The dirt contracts around the top and doesnt push it up but actually more of a downward force.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Ty Stromquist View Post

                      Another question is should I have the concrete level with the ground to the top? Basically fill the hole half way with dirt then top it off with the crete?

                      Thanks guys.
                      NO!!! Your posts will heave with the frost. Keep a 6-8" frost cap, minimum.
                      Oh man! I just shot Marvin in the face!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Ty Stromquist View Post
                        read something interesting online today. Most sites say that in hard freezing areas (US!) that you want the concrete on the bottom of the post and about a foot of dirt on top. This prevents the post from working out of the ground during the hard freeze of winter. The dirt contracts around the top and doesnt push it up but actually more of a downward force.

                        Lol...looks like you got 'er figured out.
                        Oh man! I just shot Marvin in the face!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by magnusthebigbrownlab View Post
                          Lol...looks like you got 'er figured out.

                          yea thank god I read that. Otherwise I was going to put concrete to the top so I didnt have to trim around there. Ive seen lots of people do it that way before.

                          Yesterday I got all my poles set 42-48" down set in concrete on the bottom and all the ground leveled out. Im just heading out the door to buy the panels. Everything is looking to go pretty smoothly now. The posts all seem to be good. Got one that is a little warped (MENARDS!) but I think I can make it work.

                          Thanks for all your help guys.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Lemme tell you something about panels, my friend. They're gonna be cheap quality. And they're probably not going to fit unless the inside to inside dimensions on the posts you set are the correct dimensions for the panels. The nice thing about building it piece by piece is that you're able to pick and choose your lumber, and your dimensions don't have to be exact. There is no science to a wood fence, especially slapping up the rails and pickets.
                            Oh man! I just shot Marvin in the face!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Ty Stromquist View Post
                              yea thank god I read that. Otherwise I was going to put concrete to the top so I didnt have to trim around there. Ive seen lots of people do it that way before.

                              Yesterday I got all my poles set 42-48" down set in concrete on the bottom and all the ground leveled out. Im just heading out the door to buy the panels. Everything is looking to go pretty smoothly now. The posts all seem to be good. Got one that is a little warped (MENARDS!) but I think I can make it work.

                              Thanks for all your help guys.
                              48" down? Jesus...overkill. An 8" by 30" slug with 24-27" of post in the ground is more than sufficient.
                              Oh man! I just shot Marvin in the face!

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