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    Plumbing Help

    At our cabin we have very low water pressure while our neighbors pressure is amazing. Why?

    His place is up river from us by about 30 yards and he has the most amazing water pressure. He recently had to install a new well handle and pipe because hs failed to where he had no pressure at all.

    When we pull up on the pump handle we get water but the pressure is weak. What should I do to fix this?

    There are 5 of us on the same line, and we are the last on the line. The water pressure used to be amazing. Now it's just poor. The pressure is the same if people are using their water or not.

    This is pretty much what we have.
    Last edited by Black Lab 1; 06-29-2008, 12:31 PM.

    #2
    you may have a blockage or roots in your line at one of the connections. Just a thought.
    Gotta go to the store and get some bactine. Raccoons make horrible pillows.

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      #3
      Could be one of several things, there could be a leak in one of your pipes or your neighbors, a neighbor my have increased water usage, the well and or the pump may be aging to the point that pressure is affected, there could be lime build-up in the pipes reducing the inside diameter. I doubt that you have roots growing into any of your water supply pipes thats something that usually happens with waste pipes like sewer pipes and septic laterals. You might want have a plumber come out and take a look. Like I said it could be one thing or it could be several... Good luck!

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        #4
        Originally posted by jimbosan View Post
        Could be one of several things, there could be a leak in one of your pipes or your neighbors, a neighbor my have increased water usage, the well and or the pump may be aging to the point that pressure is affected, there could be lime build-up in the pipes reducing the inside diameter. I doubt that you have roots growing into any of your water supply pipes thats something that usually happens with waste pipes like sewer pipes and septic laterals. You might want have a plumber come out and take a look. Like I said it could be one thing or it could be several... Good luck!

        I'm thinking leak as everybody else on the line has amazing water pressure. My neighbor had to replace his pump handle as he had NO water a few weeks ago. I thought once he he changed that our pressue would improve. No such luck.

        To replace his pump handle he had to dig down about 6' by hand. I really don't want to do that, but I will if have to.

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          #5
          When you say 5 of you on same line, do you mean on same pump/well or is this just an access line off a main line?

          If its 5 of you on same well/pump. You might be able to check for a leak if no one else is using water and the well servicing you is running or the pressure tank system for it is loosing pressure. This is all signs of a leak in a line. As the system is loosing pressure and having to renew it.

          If its a very severe leak, you will usually see a moisture build up at ground level close to the leak also.

          If its not the above, I have to go with blockage. Sometimes you can blow a small blockage out by applying back pressure to the line. Small air compressor should do the trick. Go easy on air pressure used, not over 25lbs. Works best if you can depressure the line that serves those 5 cabins, should be able to do that by shutting off well, then having a neighbor turn on some water to release pressure tank. Important before applying air to line make sure that your closet neighbor has an open faucet to allow the pressure to escape if it blows out the blockage.
          No vegetables were harmed in the feeding of this human.

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            #6
            I had the same problem, other than I don't share a water line with anyone... I have my own well.

            I have 4 outdoor water sources; 2 spigots and two "Iowa Standard" drain-back hydrants such as you have pictured. One of the hydrants had low pressure, everything else, including the pressure in the house was just fine.

            The shutoff valve for a drainback hydrant is well located well below the frost line, approx 4' in Nebraska. The rod that opens and closes the valve is actuated by a long brass rod connected to the handle linkage by a set screw.

            My problem was the set screw had loosened just enough to allow some slippage between the handle linkage and the valve actuator rod. Even though I would throw the handle fully over to "full on", the slippage in the linkage was only actuating the rod no more than if I had turn on the hydrant to 1/4 full.

            I readjusted the linkage, retightened the set screw, and "Voila!"... water pressure! :2thumbsup: Gadget
            "Give a man a fish... he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish... he will spend every dime he makes on uber tackle!"

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              #7
              If the linkage is fine, then I have to concur with those who are speculating that you have some kind of blockage. Gotta wonder if some gunk or gravel might have gotten in the line at the time your neighbor replaced his hydrant. :icon_rolleyes: Gadget
              "Give a man a fish... he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish... he will spend every dime he makes on uber tackle!"

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                #8
                Two bits of advice when it comes to plumbing.

                #1...poop flows down hill.

                #2...regardless of what it says on tampax boxes nowadays, DO NOT FLUSH WHITE RATS DOWN THE CAN. As the son of a former plumber, nephew of a current plumber, and grandson of a deceased plumber, I've heard horror stories of what fem. hygiene products can do to the system. My old man was a plumber in Platteville, WI...and had service calls to numerous sorority houses. Ewwwww. I've fought with girlfriends time and time again over this.
                Oh man! I just shot Marvin in the face!

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                  #9
                  Thanks all. You've given me a lot of options to consider. I'll let you know how it turns out.

                  Thanks again.

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                    #10
                    Your linkages are more than likely worn out, dig up hydrant and throw away, install Iowa brand W34 by whatever bury length you need, end of story.
                    The only difference between fishing and catching is one fish.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by hankthecrank View Post
                      Your linkages are more than likely worn out, dig up hydrant and throw away, install Iowa brand W34 by whatever bury length you need, end of story.

                      Hank, I'm going to give that a shot when we go up next weekend.

                      Thanks all.

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