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    puppy

    I got a puppy last week. He is a 9 week old yellow lab golden retriever mix. Was wondering if anyone has any tips for training or any helpful resources they could point me towards. I'll try and get a pic of him up sometime.
    "To me it looks like we're layin traps for a couple rats in the garage, when theres a family of bears runnin wild in the house." - from a different message board post

    #2
    Be consistent with your training. Don't try and do too much too fast. Depending on your type of hunting,get the dog use to the type of hunting you're gonna do. I'd go for the basic commands first and get those set solid with your dog before moving on. Alot of good dog trainers on here and I'm sure you'll get the help you'll need.

    Alex
    They have cometh

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      #3
      Thanks Alex
      "To me it looks like we're layin traps for a couple rats in the garage, when theres a family of bears runnin wild in the house." - from a different message board post

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        #4
        Here is some goor reading...
        http://www.dobbsdogs.com/library/retrievers/index.html
        Cleaning Trash Fish FromThe Pit, One State Record At A Time

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          #5
          Originally posted by Alex T.
          Be consistent with your training. Don't try and do too much too fast. Depending on your type of hunting,get the dog use to the type of hunting you're gonna do. I'd go for the basic commands first and get those set solid with your dog before moving on. Alot of good dog trainers on here and I'm sure you'll get the help you'll need.

          Alex
          :zyeathat: Exactly!

          I've got the same breed mix and he's become an unbelievable hunter. For now, spend most of your time on "yard work." That is, working in your back yard on basic commands...come, whoa, sit, yadda, yadda, yadda. This is an important time where you and your dog are working out your hierarchy and respect.

          I only really hunt upland with mine so I can't really give you any waterfowl pointers (Ty can fill you in here). As far as upland goes, it was simply a matter of getting him in the field as much as I could and on live birds...lots of praise for flushed birds, etc. etc. If you can, find someone to purchase live birds from (when your dog is well trained on obedience issues and big enough to bust brush) and get your pup on some live birds every so often. You can do all the training you want, but nothing matches the potential of letting your dog get the full experience of actually hunting from flush, shot, and retrieve. The difference I saw in my dog was radical to say the least.

          Otherwise, just make sure the both of you enjoy your time (training and playing) together. Train in short sessions (probably no more than 10 to 15 minutes to start), end on a positive note, and spend lots of time letting your dog be a pup.

          Congrats on the dog...absolutely changed my hunting experiences.

          Deas

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            #6
            There is an author by the name of Richard A. Wolters, he has several books that I believe are a must.
            Gun Dog
            Water Dog
            Family Dog (the one I should have read a bit closer)

            be prepared to lose the corners off your tables and chairs, wifes underwear, chewed up rolls of t.p, and much more

            and buy yourself a GOOD shock collar for when he gets to be a year

            Good Luck

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              #7
              Congrats on the new pup! Pups are always a blast!

              I'd just take it slow and spend a lot of fun time with him now. You won't be able to really hunt with him this year, so just get him used to cars, travel crates, going places, other people and other dogs.
              Later on this season, you could start making some noise around him and then introduce the gun.

              I'd only take him out by myself, no other dogs and hunters, if I had a chance to take him to a blind or whatever this season, but I really wouldn't plan on hunting, just let him play around a bit and then go home.

              In the spring, I'd start with introducing the pup to water once the lakes have warmed up to where you want to wade in with him a bit.

              For the next year, keep it all short, keep it snappy and just be his buddy for now. Go to the library and get some books on retriever training. Cabelas and BPS have lots of good vids and books too. Get a couple and that will help pass the time when it's still cold and the seasons aren't open.

              I might try to train him a bit on "come" and "kennel up", just sorta as it happens now. Don't get in a big hurry, he's way to young now and will we until about the first of the year for much more than just playing with him. You'll have all next year before the season to work with him. Enjoy him now!
              Become the change in the world that you seek.

              Comment


                #8
                Congrats on the new pup! Pups are always a blast!

                I'd just take it slow and spend a lot of fun time with him now. You won't be able to really hunt with him this year, so just get him used to cars, travel crates, going places, other people and other dogs.
                Later on this season, you could start making some noise around him and then introduce the gun.

                I'd only take him out by myself, no other dogs and hunters, if I had a chance to take him to a blind or whatever this season, but I really wouldn't plan on hunting, just let him play around a bit and then go home.

                In the spring, I'd start with introducing the pup to water once the lakes have warmed up to where you want to wade in with him a bit.

                For the next year, keep it all short, keep it snappy and just be his buddy for now. Go to the library and get some books on retriever training. Cabelas and BPS have lots of good vids and books too. Get a couple and that will help pass the time when it's still cold and the seasons aren't open.

                I might try to train him a bit on "come" and "kennel up", just sorta as it happens now. Don't get in a big hurry, he's way to young now and will we until about the first of the year for much more than just playing with him. You'll have all next year before the season to work with him. Enjoy him now!
                Become the change in the world that you seek.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Good luck!! and congrats on the new puppy.:2thumbup:
                  Is it duck season yet?

                  "Look, a pair of singles!"

                  Comment


                    #10
                    [quote=tomich]There is an author by the name of Richard A. Wolters, he has several books that I believe are a must.
                    Gun Dog
                    Water Dog
                    I agree with Tomich sort of. I trained my Yellow Lab using Wolters water dog and I couldn't be happier. I disagree with the comment about getting a good shock collar. I don't think shock collars are necessary if you are consisent and spend the time needed to train your new hunting partner. Remember CONSISTENCY,CONSISTENCY,CONSISTENCY. POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT,POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT,POSITIVE REINFORMENT. End on a good note and leave pup wanting more!!!By all means have FUN!!!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thanks for the helpful advice.
                      "To me it looks like we're layin traps for a couple rats in the garage, when theres a family of bears runnin wild in the house." - from a different message board post

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                        #12
                        Id also suggest joining a local dog training club. I know that the Elkhorn Valley Hunting Retriever Club is located mostly in the NE part of the state.

                        Contact Keith Spader for more details. [email protected]

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                          #13
                          I've read Wolters "Waterdog" book and used it to train my chocalate lab. Probably old school as far as training techniques- yet very effective IMO.

                          One thing that hasn't been mentioned and a very important tip from the book Waterdog:

                          I can't remember the exact age (# of weeks) that Wolters suggested doing this but - buy a cap gun and shoot it everytime right before you feed the pup. His theory was that something positive will happen after a loud bang and the dog is less likely to become gunshy.

                          I'm sure there are other steps to prevent a "gun-shy" dog but that is one thing I can remember from reading his book.

                          Obviously, the last thing you want is a well trained hunting dog that freaks out when you fire a shot and runs back to the truck.....

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hey Master Angler, I do not want to be rude and maybe I am misinformed but I believe the book "Water Dog" was written by D.L. Walters not Richard Wolters. I just came back from Walters Kennels in La Cygne Kansas picking up my 1 year old black lab, D.L. and his wife no longer live there. In fact they sold the kennel business to Doug Griener years back. But I have had the pleasure of meeting DL and he did autograph a copy of Water Dog for me.
                            Yes some of the techniques have changed from what the book speaks of but in my opinon it is the BIBLE of dog training.
                            Just though credit should go where it belongs, but I could be wrong on it, it has happened before (so my wife says)

                            Oh and to JIMK go spend the $$$ to have at least basic obiedence done by a professional it is worth every cent you spend and if you have the means to do so have the dog trained to force fetch, casting, running patterns, as far as you can afford. While the time you loose with them can never be retrieved the dog will not forget you. As I stated above I just picked up our 1 year old lab from Walters Kennels in Kansas, she is the 2nd dog we have had trained there and believe me it took all of 30 seconds for the dog to become my sons best freind once again. Doug Griener has at least 1 video out and he really follows DL Walters training regiment with some updated ways. Spend the $$ if you can and trust me when I say Momma will let that dog go where ever it wants to go if it listens!

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                              #15
                              hey lablvr, not to be rude but I am holding on to a copy of Waterdog right know copyright date 1995 by an author named Richard A Wolters

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