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    Money Spent on Hunting...

    I was reading an article the other day in the Washington Times about recreational hunting and the broad support our sport receives even from non hunters. In the article they mentioned the retail value of a hunter--consider this...

    Originally posted by [url=http://www.washingtontimes.com/sports/mueller.htm
    The Washington Times...Gene Mueller[/url]] [a recent survey by the NSSF] found that during his or her lifetime, the average American hunter spends $17,726.59 on equipment. Now add needed licenses, lodging, food, fuel, specialty magazines and meet processing, plus assorted other expenses, and the total lifetime expenditure leaps to $96,017.92...
    How do you think you'll compare to the "average hunter?" :zthink:

    Deas

    #2
    At least that much. :d

    I'll bet I've spent 10-15K dollars on fishing alone the past 3 years when you consider gear, boat, gas, bait, lodging, licences, etc.

    I will probably far surpas the 96K number and I will enjoy every second of it.

    Gotta spend it on something.

    Would be interesting to find out the average lifetime value of a golfer for comparison.
    "We subscribe to the idea that there's no such thing as failure. There's just giving up. We do not give up. We are relentless." -- The Edge, U2

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by burrodebo

      Would be interesting to find out the average lifetime value of a golfer for comparison.
      Couldn't find that specifically but here are some other interesting numbers...

      According to the National Golf Foundation, since 1986 the number of golfers has increased 34%, from 19.9 million to 26.7 million. In the same time-span, golfer spending in the US on fees and equipment has grown from $7.8 to $22.2 billion. Over the last 12 years, golf’s revenue growth rate has been 7.5% annually. The inflation factor during this period is roughly 3%, so the real growth rate is probably in the 4% to 5% range.
      Deas

      Comment


        #4
        Ah...I'm sure that I am well below that figure (just in case the Mrs is reading this). I'm just lucky she gives me a long leash and as long as Bass Pro or Cabela's doesn't garnish my paycheck I'll be OK.
        I'd rather be fishing for reds......

        Comment


          #5
          According to the National Golf Foundation, since 1986 the number of golfers has increased 34%, from 19.9 million to 26.7 million. In the same time-span, golfer spending in the US on fees and equipment has grown from $7.8 to $22.2 billion. Over the last 12 years, golf’s revenue growth rate has been 7.5% annually. The inflation factor during this period is roughly 3%, so the real growth rate is probably in the 4% to 5% range.
          Acording to those figures 26.7 millon golfers and 22.2 billion anually, the average golfer sends almost $900 a year, doesnt seem right, when the owner of my company spends $20,000 a year, just to be a member of a club, and that doesnt include the 4 times a week he goes golfing


          -Bill
          ~~~HACKED~~~
          ~~~HACKED~~~
          ~~~HACKED~~~
          ~~~HACKED~~~
          ~~~HACKED~~~
          ~~~HACKED~~~
          ~~~HACKED~~~
          ~~~HACKED~~~

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            #6
            I am not a golfer at all -- but until you have to pay $36 in "lake fees" to fish for 2 hours, I am willing to bet fishing is a cheaper activity

            Granted, if you really think about it -- on the high end of the spectrum you could spent more for fishing than for golfing, however the gotcha is -- that if you are a penny pincher or don't have that much extra money, you could still have success and fun fishing. In golf, there are certain minimum's you would have to meet in order to even put yourself into a position to participate.

            "Don't freakin' spoooool meeeeeee"

            Comment


              #7
              $17,726.59, Hmmm Im WAYYYYY over that and my life is less than half over.(I hope,) till my wife reads this! LOL
              'I'll keep my freedom, my guns and my money,
              you can keep "THE CHANGE".

              Comment


                #8
                Good God! How many times does the average hunter go hunting, twice? I've probly spent over $17,000 on hunting gear during the last 3 years and I'm not even close to having all the goodies I want! The gas/food/supplies part would have been close if I had died about 10 years ago:shock:...Man! I need to get a job a Scheels or Cabelas so I can get a discount on all this stuff ..

                Comment


                  #9
                  In being a waterfowler I am sure that over my lifetime I will spend way more than that. This sport is dang expensive. $180 for 6 goose decoys. GOOD GOD!

                  Now im buying these GHG snow fullbodies at another $125 for 6.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Ty Stromquist
                    In being a waterfowler I am sure that over my lifetime I will spend way more than that. This sport is dang expensive. $180 for 6 goose decoys. GOOD GOD!

                    Now im buying these GHG snow fullbodies at another $125 for 6.
                    The price of decoys is unreal. I honestly don't get it :zhuh:

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Chad
                      Originally posted by Ty Stromquist
                      In being a waterfowler I am sure that over my lifetime I will spend way more than that. This sport is dang expensive. $180 for 6 goose decoys. GOOD GOD!

                      Now im buying these GHG snow fullbodies at another $125 for 6.
                      The price of decoys is unreal. I honestly don't get it :zhuh:
                      I'm with you on that. I really want to try waterfowl like you can't imagine...but any way I look at it, I just can't justify the expense...I either need to win the lottery or find some rich friends.

                      Deas

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I'm way over that $96,000 figure at age 37.:shock: :d :d

                        Alex
                        They have cometh

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Right now I'm looking at another forum where I posted this below , take a look at these numbers and then look at the bigger picture regarding just how important outdoor activities are for the Economy as a whole , truly look these numbers , again I posted this on another forum on Wed Sep 27, 2006 ...

                          U.S. impact of outdoor recreation: $730 billion
                          By Joanne Kelley


                          Click Here ...

                          From birdwatchers to mountain bikers, the active set accounts for almost $300 billion in annual retail sales and contributes more than twice that to the U.S. economy, according to a Boulder, Colo.-based trade group.

                          Outdoor recreationists shell out $46 billion a year on the gear they need to hit the woods, the rivers and the slopes, according to a recent report by the Outdoor Industry Foundation.

                          But they spend five times that much ($243 billion) on all the extras — food, lodging, entertainment and transportation.

                          "We've always known we have a larger economic impact — now we have the data to support it," said Kim Coupounas, board chairman of the Outdoor Industry Association and co-founder and CEO of GoLite, a Boulder-based apparel and gear maker.

                          The study does more than measure retail sales. It also tracks the "ripple effects" of the spending. In all, it estimates active outdoor recreation pumps $730 billion annually into the U.S. economy.

                          Among other findings:

                          The industry supports about 6.5 million jobs.
                          Annual tax revenues add up to $88 billion a year.

                          The trade group hopes the fresh statistics, the most comprehensive report it has commissioned, will help it make a stronger case for protecting the wilds from development, oil drilling and the like.

                          "The purpose is really to show the economic importance of outdoor recreation — we're a force," said Clint Wall, research director for the outdoor industry group.

                          "That might change the dynamic in Washington."

                          Wall said the group wanted to take a "conservative" approach to defining the sector's economic impact.

                          It left out sales of some vehicles, boats and other big-ticket items such as second homes and cabins.

                          The study showed three-quarters of Americans take part in outdoor recreation.

                          Topping the list of avid outdoors' types: wildlife viewing participants. Birding fanatics have been a boon to the segment, which attracted 66 million people last year.

                          Biking ranked second, with 60 million people taking part. Those taking to the trails for running, hiking, rock climbing or backpacking total 56 million a year.

                          By the number, dollar impact in the U.S.

                          $46 billion: Annual sales of clothing, gear and accessories
                          $243 billion: Outdoor recreation trips involving food, lodging, entertainment and transportation
                          $730 billion: The total amount the sector winds up contributing to the economy

                          Participants

                          66 million: Wildlife viewing
                          60 million: Bicycling
                          56 million: Hiking, other trail activities
                          45 million: Camping
                          33 million: Fishing
                          24 million: Paddling
                          16 million: Snow sports
                          13 million: Hunting

                          Source: Outdoor Industry Foundation, Fall 2006 Report

                          This clearly goes to show just how important outdoor activities really are :zthumbup: ...

                          Comment


                            #14
                            The Nebraska Field Trial Association commissioned an economic impact study, maybe 5 yrs ago to figure just the impact of the attendees on the Branched Oak area just from the weekend field trials held at the grounds there at Branched Oak. The annual figure calculated by the study as something approaching $3 million in injection of outside dollars to the local area, if I remember right.

                            Just astounding.


                            My point is that the financial impact of outdoor activities is just monumental if you really stop and look at it.
                            Become the change in the world that you seek.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Chad,
                              The price of decoys is simple to justify. As long as hunters are willing to pay those prices,they'll keep selling them at that price. If(not that it'll happen) we could get all waterfowlers to boycott buying decoys for a season or two,I bet those prices would become more reasonable. Waterfowling is probably one of the most expensive hobbies to get into.

                              Alex
                              They have cometh

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