Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mineral/Salt Licks

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question: Mineral/Salt Licks

    I was wondering what you guys have been having luck with regarding mineral/salt licks??

    I bought some Lucky Buck from Bomgaar's to try and get a few more pics yet this year, but I don't think putting it out this time of year will be a good gauge on how well it really works. I've read good things about it, but one thing I don't like is the price!!

    I've also read where guys are having good luck with the Trophy Rock, but I have never used it either. Any opinions on it??

    A few years back, I got a 'recipe' off of this site that used dicalcium phosphate, trace mineral and rock salt. I don't remember the exact mixture anymore though?? I put it out in late March, and it seemed to work pretty good. The only problem with that was that I had to drive to Blair for the dicalcium phosphate because I could not find it in Fremont.

    Also, I was wondering how many licks you guys normally build?? I few years back, I did quite a few, but this year, I was thinking about doing only 3 or so in the main areas that I want to put a camera. Is this a good strategy??

    Anyway, just wanted to see what you guys are having luck with. I'd like to get them going in mid to late March.

  • #2
    Just use the cattle salt blocks, the deer are after the salt the dicalcium phosphate is more for antler development but theres really not enough in that formula to make a difference. I think if you get the blocks out now and keep your receipts its legal to hunt over them when deer season rolls around. I was just at Bomgaars and they have salt blocks for 5 bucks apiece.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by jimbosan View Post
      Just use the cattle salt blocks, the deer are after the salt the dicalcium phosphate is more for antler development but theres really not enough in that formula to make a difference. I think if you get the blocks out now and keep your receipts its legal to hunt over them when deer season rolls around. I was just at Bomgaars and they have salt blocks for 5 bucks apiece.
      We use the cattle salt blocks and biorocks. They do like the biorock a lot more though! Put em out and leave em! They typically hit the mineral licks more often in the summer time, but they will still go to them now.
      There are two pains in life! The pain of discipline, and the pain of regret!

      Comment


      • #4
        Elk and Deer Use of Mineral Licks: Implications for Disease Transmission



        Kurt C. VerCauteren1*, Michael J. Lavelle1, Gregory E. Phillips1, Justin W. Fischer1, and Randal S. Stahl1 1United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, 4101 LaPorte Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80521-2154, USA *Cooresponding author e-mail: kurt.c.vercauteren@aphis.usda.gov



        North American cervids require and actively seek out minerals to satisfy physiological requirements. Minerals required by free-ranging cervids exist within natural and artificial mineral licks that commonly serve as focal sites for cervids. Ingestion of soils contaminated with the agent that causes chronic wasting disease (CWD) may result in risk of contracting CWD. Our objective was to evaluate the extent and nature of use of mineral licks by CWD-susceptible cervid species. We used animal-activated cameras to monitor use of 18 mineral licks between 1 June and 16 October 2006 in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado. We also assessed mineral concentrations at mineral licks to evaluate correlations between visitation rates and site-specific characteristics. We collected > 400,000 images of which 991 included elk, 293 included deer, and 6 included moose. We documented elk and deer participating in a variety of potentially risky behaviors (e.g., ingesting soil, ingesting water, defecating, urinating) while at mineral licks. Results from the mineral analyses combined with camera data revealed that visitation was highest at sodium-rich mineral licks. Mineral licks may play a role in disease transmission by acting as sites of increased interaction as well as reservoirs for deposition, accumulation, and ingestion of disease agents.




        http://www.cwd-info.org/pdf/3rd_CWD_Symposium_utah.pdf



        http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...sium-july.html



        http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/




        kind regards, terry

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by flounder9 View Post
          Elk and Deer Use of Mineral Licks: Implications for Disease Transmission



          Kurt C. VerCauteren1*, Michael J. Lavelle1, Gregory E. Phillips1, Justin W. Fischer1, and Randal S. Stahl1 1United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, 4101 LaPorte Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80521-2154, USA *Cooresponding author e-mail: kurt.c.vercauteren@aphis.usda.gov



          North American cervids require and actively seek out minerals to satisfy physiological requirements. Minerals required by free-ranging cervids exist within natural and artificial mineral licks that commonly serve as focal sites for cervids. Ingestion of soils contaminated with the agent that causes chronic wasting disease (CWD) may result in risk of contracting CWD. Our objective was to evaluate the extent and nature of use of mineral licks by CWD-susceptible cervid species. We used animal-activated cameras to monitor use of 18 mineral licks between 1 June and 16 October 2006 in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado. We also assessed mineral concentrations at mineral licks to evaluate correlations between visitation rates and site-specific characteristics. We collected > 400,000 images of which 991 included elk, 293 included deer, and 6 included moose. We documented elk and deer participating in a variety of potentially risky behaviors (e.g., ingesting soil, ingesting water, defecating, urinating) while at mineral licks. Results from the mineral analyses combined with camera data revealed that visitation was highest at sodium-rich mineral licks. Mineral licks may play a role in disease transmission by acting as sites of increased interaction as well as reservoirs for deposition, accumulation, and ingestion of disease agents.




          http://www.cwd-info.org/pdf/3rd_CWD_Symposium_utah.pdf



          http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...sium-july.html



          http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/




          kind regards, terry
          Huh? Maybe thats how mad cow disease moves from one cow to another:xGoofey:
          There are two pains in life! The pain of discipline, and the pain of regret!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Weekend Warrior View Post
            Huh? Maybe thats how mad cow disease moves from one cow to another:xGoofey:

            actually, to date, there is no strong evidence for horizontal transmission with the typical c-BSE aka mad cow (UK mad cow strain supposedly). however, with atypical BSE and atypical scrapie cases mounting, and the fact now that CWD has mutated into a second strain, there is concern for this. i think it was last year, or the year before, i proposed just that to some of the Prion Gods in a journal. anyone interested can review here ;


            CWD to cattle figures CORRECTION


            Greetings,



            I believe the statement and quote below is incorrect ;



            "CWD has been transmitted to cattle after intracerebral inoculation, although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001]). This finding raised concerns that CWD prions might be transmitted to cattle grazing in contaminated pastures."



            Please see ;



            Within 26 months post inoculation, 12 inoculated animals had lost weight, revealed abnormal clinical signs, and were euthanatized. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of a unique pattern of the disease agent in tissues of these animals. These findings demonstrate that when CWD is directly inoculated into the brain of cattle, 86% of inoculated cattle develop clinical signs of the disease.





            http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/pub..._no_115=194089







            " although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001]). "



            shouldn't this be corrected, 86% is NOT a low rate. ...



            kindest regards,


            Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

            P.O. Box 42

            Bacliff, Texas USA 77518


            Thank you!



            Thanks so much for your updates/comments. We intend to publish as rapidly as possible all updates/comments that contribute substantially to the topic under discussion.

            http://cshperspectives.cshlp.org/letters/submit



            re-Prions David W. Colby1,* and Stanley B. Prusiner1,2 + Author Affiliations 1Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 2Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 Correspondence: stanley@ind.ucsf.edu



            http://cshperspectives.cshlp.org/con....full.pdf+htmlhttp://cshperspectives.cshlp.org/con....full.pdf+html









            Greetings,





            I believe the statement and quote below is incorrect ;





            "CWD has been transmitted to cattle after intracerebral inoculation, although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001]). This finding raised concerns that CWD prions might be transmitted to cattle grazing in contaminated pastures."





            Please see ;





            Within 26 months post inoculation, 12 inoculated animals had lost weight, revealed abnormal clinical signs, and were euthanatized. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of a unique pattern of the disease agent in tissues of these animals. These findings demonstrate that when CWD is directly inoculated into the brain of cattle, 86% of inoculated cattle develop clinical signs of the disease.







            http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/pub..._no_115=194089









            "although the infection rate was low (4 of 13 animals [Hamir et al. 2001])."





            shouldn't this be corrected, 86% is NOT a low rate. ...









            kindest regards,



            Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518









            MARCH 1, 2011





            UPDATED CORRESPONDENCE FROM AUTHORS OF THIS STUDY I.E. COLBY, PRUSINER ET AL, ABOUT MY CONCERNS OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THEIR FIGURES AND MY FIGURES OF THE STUDIES ON CWD TRANSMISSION TO CATTLE ;







            ----- Original Message -----





            From: David Colby





            To: flounder9@verizon.net





            Cc: stanley@XXXXXXXX





            Sent: Tuesday, March 01, 2011 8:25 AM





            Subject: Re: FW: re-Prions David W. Colby1,* and Stanley B. Prusiner1,2 + Author Affiliations







            Dear Terry Singeltary,





            Thank you for your correspondence regarding the review article Stanley Prusiner and I recently wrote for Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives. Dr. Prusiner asked that I reply to your message due to his busy schedule. We agree that the transmission of CWD prions to beef livestock would be a troubling development and assessing that risk is important. In our article, we cite a peer-reviewed publication reporting confirmed cases of laboratory transmission based on stringent criteria. The less stringent criteria for transmission described in the abstract you refer to lead to the discrepancy between your numbers and ours and thus the interpretation of the transmission rate. We stand by our assessment of the literature--namely that the transmission rate of CWD to bovines appears relatively low, but we recognize that even a low transmission rate could have important implications for public health and we thank you for bringing attention to this matter.





            Warm Regards, David Colby -- David Colby, PhDAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of Delaware







            ====================END...TSS==============




            http://betaamyloidcjd.blogspot.com/2...rion-like.html



            UPDATED DATA ON 2ND CWD STRAIN

            Wednesday, September 08, 2010

            CWD PRION CONGRESS SEPTEMBER 8-11 2010



            http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...rion-2010.html



            kind regards,
            terry
            Last edited by flounder9; 01-21-2012, 09:30 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Flounder is was more of a joke but props for the info!
              There are two pains in life! The pain of discipline, and the pain of regret!

              Comment


              • #8
                We just set a camera near a salt block used for cattle. After we move them to greener pastures the deer can't get enough of the leftovers and pose for some great photos. We also have the salt licks set in shallow plastic tubs to keep cattle from licking a whole in the ground after the block is gone. You have to poke some small holes in the bottom but it keeps them from licking dirt.
                Follow NEFGA on Facebook!! www.facebook.com/nefga.org

                Comment


                • #9
                  My old man is a feed dealer and suggested I try using the 365 mineral he sells. I bought a bag of that and set it next to the "deer mineral" and they hit both of them until the "deer mineral" got wet and then got moldy and then continued to eat a 6" hole where the cattle mineral was at. At about $17 a bag for the cattle mineral compared to a $50 for the same amount I have not bought the deer minerals for two years now. If you look at the salt content on the two the salt in the deer minerals is closer to 45% where in the cattle mineral it's about 20% and is well balanced with calcium and phosphorus.
                  Shoot 'em in the lips


                  It'll be aight, they make more

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Chuck what brand is the 'cattle mineral' or what exactly does a guy ask for when trying to buy that??

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've been using Deer Cane Black Magic. Has worked well for me, but its also all i've used.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DaWildBohemian View Post
                        Chuck what brand is the 'cattle mineral' or what exactly does a guy ask for when trying to buy that??
                        I'd just say im looking for an all season cattle mineral. The brand he sells is Kent and theirs is called 365 mineral.
                        Shoot 'em in the lips


                        It'll be aight, they make more

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Chuck I do the same thing with the mixture that is all over the net. Cheap and very effective. I have bought all the different name brand crap and they are all just the same mix with a pretty bag or spokesman filling you full o crap.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I used to just use the cattle salt or mineral block. The last couple of years I have used the Trophy Rock, and had amazing results. The deer love it and it is supposed to be full of valueable minerals.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The cattle stuff I use is mineral the salt content in it is very low compared to the other stuff. Here is what the content consists of....



                              Calcium (Ca), min
                              15.3%
                              Calcium (Ca), max
                              18.3%
                              Phosphorus (P), min
                              8.0%
                              Salt (NaCl), min
                              13.5%
                              Salt (NaCl), max
                              16.2%
                              Magnesium (Mg), min
                              1.0%
                              Potassium (K), min
                              0.15%
                              Copper (Cu), min
                              1450 ppm
                              Manganese (Mn), min
                              4950 ppm
                              Selenium (Se), min
                              26.4 ppm
                              Zinc (Zn), min
                              4750 ppm
                              Vitamin A, min
                              380,000 IU/lb
                              Vitamin D3, min
                              100,000 IU/lb
                              Vitamin E, min
                              375 IU/lb
                              Shoot 'em in the lips


                              It'll be aight, they make more

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X