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    Opinions Needed Bow Tuning Cost?

    Anyone know how much an average tune up would cost? I'd like to get my bow tuned before the season and don't have the confidence in myself to do it.
    Fishing trips aren't measured in pounds and inches; they're measured in smiles, laughter, and memories with friends and family.

    #2
    You should be able to take it to any local archery shop and get the most experienced person to work on it or Scheels, BPS and cabellas will also look it over usually for free. If you are looking for a paper tune that might have a cost since it can be time consuming. I purchased my Mathews at Scheels and they have looked it over every year since I got it in 2001 which takes 15-30 minutes and have never been charged. But it seems like every other year I need or Want some new accessory.

    Be aware Scheels does do not honor Military Veterans with a discount if that applies to you. I know BPS and Cabellas offer a 10% discount to Veterans.

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      #3
      What do you expect to get out of somebody else "tuning " your bow? Are you expecting them to set it up so that you get the most accurate groups you are capable of ? Or are you wanting them to check over the general "health" of the bow for wear and tear?

      If you are looking at group tuning it really is a simple thing to do yourself. All things being equal as in proper arrow spine and so on tuning for groups comes down to very simple adjustments of nock point up and down the string and/or the arrow rest being moved right to left.

      Here is how easy the arrow rest adjustment is ……

      Shoot a few groups at a single bulls eye and when you have the best one you think you are capable of leave the most centered arrow in the butt and pull the rest. Hang a string with a weight around that arrow and let it hang 36 " or so.

      Move back 10 yards and aim at the bulls eye your arrow is stuck in. Now keep in mind you won't actually be hitting the bullesye as you are farther back. However while your arrow may hit 4 inches low or so a "perfectly" tuned bow on the horizontal axis will hit close to that string at 10 - 20 -30 yards and so on. Of course how close depends on your skill . However if it consistently looks like a set of stairs right or left some moving of your rest needs to take place. Your close when your vertical string looks more like a drunk walking a straight line , as in a little on both sides but nothing WAY out of line. Just like your sights, you move the rest one way or the other depending on what your groups tell you .

      If your not afraid to move your sights you should not be afraid to move your rest. It's the EXACT same concept!!

      Now you are 1/2 tuned to YOUR shooting style. No shop can do any better. However you should do your vertical axis ( nock) first. That's another easy process
      Last edited by centerx; 08-23-2011, 09:33 AM.

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        #4
        Originally posted by centerx View Post
        What do you expect to get out of somebody else "tuning " your bow? Are you expecting them to set it up so that you get the most accurate groups you are capable of ? Or are you wanting them to check over the general "health" of the bow for wear and tear?

        If you are looking at group tuning it really is a simple thing to do yourself. All things being equal as in proper arrow spine and so on tuning for groups comes down to very simple adjustments of nock point up and down the string and/or the arrow rest being moved right to left.

        Here is how easy the arrow rest adjustment is ……

        Shoot a few groups at a single bulls eye and when you have the best one you think you are capable of leave the most centered arrow in the butt and pull the rest. Hang a string with a weight around that arrow and let it hang 36 " or so.

        Move back 10 yards and aim at the bulls eye your arrow is stuck in. Now keep in mind you won't actually be hitting the bullesye as you are farther back. However while your arrow may hit 4 inches low or so a "perfectly" tuned bow on the horizontal axis will hit close to that string at 10 - 20 -30 yards and so on. Of course how close depends on your skill . However if it consistently looks like a set of stairs right or left some moving of your rest needs to take place. Your close when your vertical string looks more like a drunk walking a straight line , as in a little on both sides but nothing WAY out of line. Just like your sights, you move the rest one way or the other depending on what your groups tell you .

        If your not afraid to move your sights you should not be afraid to move your rest. It's the EXACT same concept!!

        Now you are 1/2 tuned to YOUR shooting style. No shop can do any better. However you should do your vertical axis ( nock) first. That's another easy process
        M_agreed:

        A shop can inspect the bow for any mechanical issues but you should be the one shooting the bow when paper tuning or sighting in your pins. A good shop will take the time to walk you through a lot of this. You may pay for a little range time at the most.
        There are two pains in life! The pain of discipline, and the pain of regret!

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          #5
          A general inspection can be done by anybody. Look at the string. If it's frayed or worn it may be time to have a shop look at it. Most of the strands that break do so under the serving so nobody is going to be seeing this problem unless they remove the serving.

          If the serving is separated it may need to be reserved

          Look for general limb health. Crack's , chips ect. Same with the riser . It's rare but they can crack and fail.

          Look for rough spots on the cams as in chips or dings. Any screw you can put a wrench to do so and check for tightness. A little lock tite THE RELEASABLE KIND !!!! Goes a long way to preventing and solving problems.

          Honestly if you don't notice any problem chances are there are not any . The rest of the "checks" and routine maintenance will need a bow press. For example, checking the axels to see if they are bent. Lubing limb bolts and/or rockers in the limb pockets ( if the bow has them) ect. It's been a long time since I have seen a pro shop tear down a bow and look at it ( excluding a known problem of course) on this level in the name of routine maintenance. Maybe some do , not sure? I know I do!

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            #6
            So, how much does an average tune up cost??? 10$, 50$, 100$

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              #7
              After its looked over, just shoot a fixed blade. That will tell you if your bow is "tuned". I wouldn't even bother to paper tune or pay someone to do it. Chances are, you'll have to pull it out of paper tune to get your bh's to hit with your practice tips anyway.

              If you want your fixed blades to hit with your practice tips, follow what centerx posted above. I use my first pin and shoot at 10,20,30,40 aiming at the exact same spot. Your arrows will drop along the string, but it will give you the direction your rest will need to move. Walkback tuning is all you need for broadhead tuning unless something is really wrong.
              "There's more fun hunting with the handicap of a bow than there is hunting with the sureness of a gun" -Fred Bear

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                #8
                Originally posted by nedyarb View Post
                So, how much does an average tune up cost??? 10$, 50$, 100$
                Depending on what you want, just meet me at a archery range. Ill show you what I know and as long as I don't have to drag along a bowpress, its very simple. Im by far an expert, but I have bh tuned several bows within a hour. A dropaway rest should take 20 minutes and maybe 8 or 10 shots altogether.
                "There's more fun hunting with the handicap of a bow than there is hunting with the sureness of a gun" -Fred Bear

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by nedyarb View Post
                  So, how much does an average tune up cost??? 10$, 50$, 100$



                  I honestly could not tell you . However I would venture to guess if you took a bow into a few shops and asked for a "tune up " you would be paying various prices for various services.

                  What they should do is use levels and sometimes a laser to make sure your rest and nocking point is 90 degree square and level. If you have ever put in a wood fence ,squaring up the post and making sure the sections were straight you understand the concept exactly.The rest is one post, the nocking point is the other. How do you keep that 8 foot section between "post" ( or in my example a 28" arrow ) straight and square?? You square up the post ( rest and nock) and you level the section (arrow) you are going to attach to the post right? Now you know how to tune like a shop !

                  However the difference is once done your fence stay's square and level. Once the shop is done you pick up the bow and nothing is square and level. It's one of the reasons a lot of sights have level's on them. If the bow is square it won't shoot square unless you are. If you find it hard to square up no problem. Tune the bow to your shooting style so you and the bow are square. I just showed you one way of doing so , there are others.

                  Speaking of sights and level's . If you use the level on your site you may want to make sure it was level and square when being tuned at the same time your nock and rest was level and square.

                  I have seen way to many people shoot poorly but refused to make the adjustments to their gear to shoot better because it was "professionally" tuned and it had to be right! Well, it was right , at least as right as it could be without the shooter interaction.

                  Tuning a bow is not hard. It requires no special tools or knowledge. Maintenance on a bow however requires a basic understanding and ONE special tool and that's a press. Guns are no different. It comes out of the box at factory specs and you bore sight it on the bench. That does not make it even close to the tack driver it could be if you make it fit you and play with the scope some!
                  Last edited by centerx; 08-23-2011, 01:17 PM.

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                    #10
                    Man you guys are scaring me. My dad gave me his bow that he bought in 1996, he never even used it. He is 6'1 and I am 6'3 so I figured how hard can it be. I fired about 200 arrows through it and said good enough. But I have a feeling if someone looked at it they would laugh at me and tell me I needed a new one. Rob

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                      #11
                      Don't be scared . It's all good and pretty easy….

                      Step one with a new bow. Make sure it fits !

                      Here is how I set mine up from scratch……

                      Screw on the rest. Make sure that the arrow roughly bisects the hole in the riser the rest screw into. Maybe a little higher if you need vane clearance from the shelf. I screw on my 30" target stabilizer and adjust the rest until the arrow lies square over the top of the stabilizer for it's entire length. A hunting stabilizer works just fine. Were just eyeballing it at this point.
                      String loop /nock point tied on so the arrow sits level on the rest. Eyeballing it works .

                      Now on to a rough paper tune. I do this at close range 10 yards or less. Shoot through paper removing any bad right /left tears by moving the rest accordingly right or left. When it's as good as you think you can get it ( perfect not required just what you thing you are capable of ) work on any tears up/down by moving your nock point OR your arrow rest . I will move the rest a little as long as I don't get to high/low on the hole in the riser. If you need to go to high or low then you need a more coarse adjustment on your nocking point. Again perfect is not required and a slightly high tear is considered desirable by some. Try to work out any low tears however.

                      Site in for 10 or 20 yards and group tune as I explained. When it's good it's good. If the paper shows something different ignore it. You want perfect rips in paper or to nail bullesyes??

                      As I final check I will check nock height trough paper at the same yardages that I group tuned. They key is not necessarily perfect bullets at 10,20/30 or more yards. What you should see is bullet hole or slight tear at 10 yards or less. At the longer yardages the arrow should have had time to level out and you should show pretty nice bullet holes. If not you could have some more tuning to do. A fishtailing arrow at longer distances is not normal and can play heck with broad head tuning.

                      Another other method for tuning nock height involves shooting at the narrowest VERTICAL line you can hit and adjusting for any high /low flyers similar to the way you tuned off a horizontal plumb line for the rest adjustment.

                      All you need is a hex wrench and some freezer paper. Some powdered foot spray and/or lipstick helps check for clearence problems if you think you have them

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                        #12
                        Thanks all for the info, my original reason for asking the question was that I recently acquired a new sight, nock, and rest and was overwhelmed when my research on 'bow tuning' brought up things like timing the cams and stuff like that.

                        With my old accessories, I was shooting fairly consistently from 40yds in. I'm not looking to get a bow tuned up and all that so it can shoot 60, 70, 80yds or anything like that. On occasion, when shooting with friends we like to push the distance 50 and beyond, but that's simply for the fun of it. Any game animals outside of 40yds will go unscathed through the season if I meet them in the field.

                        My intent for having my bow tuned by a professional was to have them make sure everything is working as smoothly, quietly, and efficiently as possible. I maintain my bow regularly; check limbs, wax the string, check all screws/hex for tightness, etc. My main concern was any timing issues of the cams since I shoot a 2 cam bow.
                        Fishing trips aren't measured in pounds and inches; they're measured in smiles, laughter, and memories with friends and family.

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                          #13
                          For cam tuning you will need a press and if you don't own one you of course will need a shop. Two cams are easy. All you care about is that they hit the "wall" at the same time . Single cams are not "timed" as much as they are tuned for maximum efficiency and that seems to be a little bit of a mystery depending on how the cam was designed. Every single cam has it's sweet spot for performance. NORMALLY that involves getting maximum wrap around the cam when the bow is at rest. Doing so feeds into the bows power stroke at draw more efficiently. However lot's of expereience with diffrent platforms is were a pro shop can really shine in this area

                          Everything else you may need to do from a mounting accessories and tuning standpoint I personally would not pay anybody to do.

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                            #14
                            Thanks again, I tinkered around with the new accessories last night getting them lined up (eyeballing) and things like that. Is there a way to see if the cams are timed without taking it to a 'professional'? I'm not going to try to do anything with them as I don't have a press and don't feel like paying for something that isn't necessary. I read somewhere about pulling back to full draw, letting off enough so the cams roll over and then pull back again to full to see if they're hitting at the same time. I tried it last night and couldn't tell, they looked good to me, but I may be off.

                            Saturday, I plan on spending a lot of time at the range with the directions you gave in hand. I think I've gotten most everything lined up so I have a good starting point.
                            Fishing trips aren't measured in pounds and inches; they're measured in smiles, laughter, and memories with friends and family.

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                              #15

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