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Wingshooting Lessons Needed

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    Wingshooting Lessons Needed

    Hi All! I'm have having a great 1st year hunting with my new pup. I've been bird hunting in previous years but not real seriously or very successfully. Now with my own dog and extra time spent in the field, I have had dozens of upland bird opportunities, with really only about 12 birds bagged. My dog has come along real well for me, which was my goal for this first year - to focus on him. But now I need to hit more of the birds that he points for me. My confidence in hitting birds has gone down as the year went on. I've decided the next step in my journey for me and my dog is to learn to be a good wingshooter, at a reasonable cost. Many states DNRs have clinics, but I don't see that in NE. Any ideas on getting help for someone like me to get my shotgun skills to the next level? I'm in Papillion, NE. Thanks!

    #2
    Shoot bluerock from all positions in the offseason.

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      #3
      Practice during the offseason is key. There's a trap range not far from you that might be able to help you out. Years ago one of the guys that worked there went out and watched me shoot and gave me some pointers. To save $$ you could get a few buddies together and buy a bunch of clay pigeons and a hand thrower. There's a few WMAs around that allow clay shooting just make sure to pick up your hulls.

      For me I really notice an improvement in my wing shooting the years I've spent some time shooting clays vs. dusting the gun off the night before opening morning.
      A fairy tale starts out "once upon a time", a fisherman's story starts out "this ain't no bull****".
      ~Captain Phil Harris

      If I could not hunt, the only thing that would be left I guess would be to die. ~ Phil Robertson

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        #4
        Try to find a couple of farmers that have a pigeon problem. That is some of the best practice you'll ever find and you can do it all year long. Make sure you are aiming with both eyes open. Closing one eye with a shotgun lowers accuracy. Also, keep your gun moving in the line of flight in sideways or overhead situations. I have known a lot of really good trap shooters that struggled in the field. It is a completely different shooting scenario so keep that in mind if you decide to spend a lot of time practicing with basic clay pigeon shooting. Sporting clays are a little better but that can get expensive if you do it a lot.

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          #5
          Like the others have said you need to shoot more. With the weather the way it is no one wants to shoot clay targets right now. If you PM me I think I can help.

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            #6
            You are not the only one buddy! !!!! It seems like once you have dogs, you are more concentrated on shooting those birds that they point......a distraction and by all means a blessing. .....BUT....it's not You being able to hit those birds .....it's your "distraction " that brings your "motion" down. It seems like your hunting buddies are doing their job, now it's time for you to settle down and do yours.....don't spend any money trying to "get better".......just go hunting. There has been plenty of times my dog has pointed a big fat rooster.....and I completely whiffed on it.....and my dog gave me "THAT LOOK".... This is part of the fun.

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            • Adventurer
              Adventurer commented
              Editing a comment
              I like your thinking. Thanks!

            #7
            Your dog is a pointer, so I'm assuming you're getting birds jumping up right at your feet? What choke do you have in your shotgun? With a pointing dog, you should be shooting most of your birds inside 35 yards. That's improved cylinder territory, or maybe even a skeet tube if the wind isn't blowing hard and you're huntin' in close cover.

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            • Adventurer
              Adventurer commented
              Editing a comment
              Yep, using IC. I switched to that just recently. Thanks!

            #8
            Originally posted by uglymike View Post
            Your dog is a pointer, so I'm assuming you're getting birds jumping up right at your feet? What choke do you have in your shotgun? With a pointing dog, you should be shooting most of your birds inside 35 yards. That's improved cylinder territory, or maybe even a skeet tube if the wind isn't blowing hard and you're huntin' in close cover.
            Someone needs to tell the birds to read the script and wait for a point!

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              #9
              Have you ever check which eye is your dominant eye? If you shoot right handed, it should be your right eye. If it's your left eye and you're trying to shoot right handed you're going to have an up hill battle.

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              • Adventurer
                Adventurer commented
                Editing a comment
                Right and right, so I am good. Thanks!

              #10
              Something you can work on at home is muscle memory. Practice shouldering the gun (unloaded of course, triple check it) aim at the corner where the wall and ceiling meet and follow the line across the room left to right and right to left. Similar to following the flying birds on a passing shot.

              We always like dog pics 😉
              When you have the option, please buy American made. If it does not save your job, it might save mine.

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              • Adventurer
                Adventurer commented
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                I'll do that. Thanks! I attached dog pic too

              • Luv2Decoy
                Luv2Decoy commented
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                The info above is the best way to get better quickly. You can practice till you are blue on the range but if your mount is not consistent, your point of impact will change on each shot. I notice when I change over to winter clothes that my shooting suffers for a trip or two. Good luck

              #11
              Good points above- Another consideration is ammunition selection and shot size. You should read up on steel shot vs lead shot, velocities and charges of both, and shot size selection. There is a very real difference between low end ammunition and high end upland ammo. I'm not saying you need to buy $20 a box ammo, but you should know the differences of whats out there to help select the right ammo for you. Here is a quick article to get you started. http://shotshell.drundel.com/steel.htm

              I bring all of this up because many guys practice with low brass trap loads and then hunt with high brass steel shot on public areas. There is a big difference in speed and pattern between the two.

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              • Adventurer
                Adventurer commented
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                Yes, I do need to learn more about loads. Thanks.

              #12

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              • basshuntr89
                basshuntr89 commented
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                Good looking pup! Did you train your dog yourself?

              #13
              Thanks. Yes, I trained him myself and glad I did. Much learning, work and time with him but it’s created a good bond, so he’s always looking to me. Still has more to learn but he’s getting everything in time.
              Last edited by Adventurer; 01-03-2019, 08:39 PM. Reason: Reply to basshuntr89

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              • basshuntr89
                basshuntr89 commented
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                That’s awesome. What resources or materials did you use, if you don’t mind me asking? I would like to get a Brittany someday, but am intimidated by the thought of trying to try train myself.

              #14
              Adventurer:

              I've got a buddy that used to be the sponsored sporting clays shooter for Perazzi shotguns. Here are the tips he gives me.

              1) Get fit to your gun! I haven't heard anybody talk about that yet.
              2) Get rid of the front bead, it doesn't help you. He files the bead off the front if his shotguns come with them.
              3) Focus solely on the front beak of the bird and follow through


              Also, pay attention to what you are wearing. I hunted ND earlier this year during bluebird weather and was killing every time I pulled the trigger. The final day of the hunt a cold front came through and I had to wear a jacket and gloves and I missed the first three birds I had shots at. It took me some time to adjust my mount (Kept hanging up on my jacket)

              Hardcore guys will have a different gun fitted to them for different clothing options. It does make a difference in accuracy.

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              • Adventurer
                Adventurer commented
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                Great food for thought. Filing down the bead may be the last thing I try though 😀 and the heavier coat late in the season I think did make for trouble.

              #15
              Try to try different guns if you can. It is important to find a gun that fits. I can hit with any shotgun from the trap line. But in the field it needs to quick and natural.

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