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    December line

    Click image for larger version  Name:	very muddy DP coon.jpg Views:	1 Size:	126.7 KB ID:	1219846 Well, that was fun. 4" of rain and then snow the first week of December, and first week we never got back above freezing temps. Then the daily warmups with freezing at night. Keeping traps operating in freeze-thaw conditions is work. Lots of set maintenance. Used about 40 gallons of dry bedding material to keep the coyote traps operating. Mud, mud, everywhere. We made every set at least 1/4 to 1/2 mile off the road. Parked carefully just off to side of the muddy road and hiked in to check. Carried everything in, carried everything out. No ATV/UTV, just a nice daily average of 25,505 steps per my garmin watch. Best exercise program in the world!
    Pulled last of our traps on Friday afternoon. Was a fun 21 days on our line. Five farms, about 30 traps out. Ran them either starting at 3:00AM so I could be back in time to get the boys up for school and myself to work, or, ran them at night after work or other activities and commitments. Weekends were a treat because we could run them in daylight without flashlights.
    some pics to share Click image for larger version  Name:	fencerow coyote.jpg Views:	1 Size:	89.1 KB ID:	1219844Click image for larger version  Name:	muddy Nebr red in 175 bridger.jpg Views:	1 Size:	131.4 KB ID:	1219845 Click image for larger version  Name:	Gunner beaver.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	47.7 KB ID:	1219868

    #2
    snowy coon in DP, typical mowed hay field coyote location, and hey looky what we found in a corn field! The balloon didn't hurt any animal from what I could tell either! Click image for larger version  Name:	Snowy DP coon.jpg Views:	1 Size:	72.0 KB ID:	1219848Click image for larger version  Name:	setting Montana 2s in hayfield.jpg Views:	1 Size:	156.5 KB ID:	1219849Click image for larger version  Name:	touchdown.jpg Views:	1 Size:	142.9 KB ID:	1219850

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      #3
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        #4
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          #5
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            #6
            Click image for larger version  Name:	montana 2 coyote.jpg Views:	1 Size:	88.3 KB ID:	1219864Click image for larger version  Name:	pipe set coon.jpg Views:	1 Size:	140.2 KB ID:	1219865Click image for larger version  Name:	possum in mink box 110.jpg Views:	1 Size:	166.5 KB ID:	1219866Click image for larger version  Name:	snowy coyote.jpg Views:	1 Size:	104.0 KB ID:	1219867
            The boys were awesome partners this month. Lot of walking, but good time spent together. Noah and I got this coyote in snowstorm at beginning of the month. Couldn't hardly see 10' in front of us in our flashlight beams, we got off track a little hiking in and ended up on wrong side of a draw, sets were on other side. Worked out OK because this coyote was waiting for us once we got to the right side in that snow storm. We laughed the whole way back to the truck across 1/2 mile of picked corn.

            I will rant a little here though. Folks, if you are out "coyote hunting" and driving through corn fields, edges of draws, maybe where you think you have permission, or maybe you don't care, whatever. Please don't shoot and take the coyote you encounter in someone else's trap. It's illegal. Your truck tracks up the ditch and through the cornfield, down along the draw, and right up to our set, the boot prints to and from your truck, the shell casings, the catch circle, the blood in the catch circle, blood droplets back across the snow to your truck tracks then stop, the snapped trap but hey you took the time to cover that back up. Not often you find snapped traps covered up (but hey, thank you for not stealing it...but if you were trying to steal it I hope you threw your back out trying to pull that earth anchor from the frozen ground and that you just gave up...). I'm no forensic scientist but you painted about as loud and clear a picture of the crime scene as you possibly could. And gosh it was a real interesting conversation I had to have with my two sons on the long walk back to our truck after what we just came across on our line, too. They both promised me that they would never do that to anyone else...because they were not happy someone did it to them. The land owner isn't happy either, and by now you probably noticed the new t-posts he drove into the field at the spot where you drove into his corn. he is getting real tired of dealing with you and evidently you have been doing it for years. The boys and I picked up your beer bottles you threw in the field, too. Real nice. I couldn't have taught them a better outdoorsman lesson than what you just helped me with... leave other folks' stuff alone.

            Enough rant.

            We had a very fun albeit difficult conditions season. Folks trapping is a lot of fun, and its the best time I get to spend with my boys every single calendar day while our sets are out in the field!

            Later all!
            Jim, Noah, and Gunner

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              #7
              I look forward to your trapping posts every year. I used to trap a little a long time ago. Great job getting the kids involved.

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              • Jigger
                Jigger commented
                Editing a comment
                I second the motion on getting your boys involved. Great teaching experience.

              #8
              Very nice, I am no trapper but enjoyed these posts immensely. Thanks

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                #9
                Good to see you and the boys getting after them again this year Jim. Like many others, I look forward to these posts every year.

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                  #10
                  You caught some nice looking coyotes! Waiting on 2019 insurance information to get knees replaced so only put out a few traps where I could drive into the field. Turkeys and quail have a better chance of nesting success now that there's fewer egg eaters. The mud ended my coyote trapping way too soon this year.

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                    #11
                    Nice Jim. I know there's going to be a lot more turkeys hatching where I was at with all the possum and skunks I caught.

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                      #12
                      Thanks Jim, I trapped in the 80's and 90's close to Lincoln and I know what it feels like to have some Lazy A** steal your fur then traps and fur. Keep up the good work teaching those boys the right thing to do and loving the outdoors!

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                        #13
                        Thanks for sharing.

                        Trespassers/thief's are frustrating!

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                          #14
                          Daryl Bauer
                          Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
                          Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
                          [email protected]
                          http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

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                            #15
                            Great post and pic's! Not a trapper but I sure do appreciate how trappers help to control the 4 legged nest raiders. Wouldn't it be great if the NE G&P found some cash to reward trappers for lowering the populations of nest raiders on public pheasant/quail hunting ground? Maybe offer a couple bucks more per animal trapped on the public land as a bounty? Forgive my ignorance but what do you do with opposum and skunk's that are trapped? Is there a market for their hide as well?

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