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  • piscatorious
    replied
    Originally posted by Old Nebraska Guy View Post

    #19.4

    piscatorious wrote

    "Well, there is absolutely no scientific reasoning behind expanding crossbow deer license availability so don't try to make that claim. The only driving reasons behind the expansion were monetary and convenience."

    Well....
    What scientific reasoning exists for having ANY archery season?



    I never said, or even insinuated, there was one. I just referenced a clearly obvious fact.

    IMO, if, and when, people get too old or frail to pull back a standard type bow they should opt for a rifle permit, and if they like spending time in nature because the archery season is longer then they can go for a walk and set in a tree with a camera.

    I'm free to have an opinion, I don't need scientific reasoning to dislike crossbows.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Nebraska Guy
    replied


    #19.4

    piscatorious wrote

    "Well, there is absolutely no scientific reasoning behind expanding crossbow deer license availability so don't try to make that claim. The only driving reasons behind the expansion were monetary and convenience."

    Well....
    What scientific reasoning exists for having ANY archery season?




    Leave a comment:


  • tjm
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • Riverbowhunter
    commented on 's reply
    As we continue to lose hunters every year I very much disagree with one buck. We need to encourage hunting not discourage it.

  • Old Nebraska Guy
    replied
    As Whitetips stated above, if you have never gone to a "deer meeting" you should. You can get a feeling for what is covered by reviewing the power point slides from a meeting held in the SE Region last year.

    http://outdoornebraska.gov/wp-conten...esentation.pdf

    I think a lot of questions about permits, resident and non-resident can be explained by one statement that G&P would like to control deer populations by hunting and an opinion of mine is that there aren't enough resident hunters to kill enough deer to keep the population in check. So attracting out-of-staters is needed to put more guns/arrows in the field. Just checkout the harvest numbers and the landowner complaints from the slideshow leading up 2012.

    A sidebar, a Minnesota non-resident permit is cheaper, $186, than a Nebraska non-resident permit, $242-$249. Not certain what that has to do with anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Nebraska Guy
    replied
    This is just speculation, but the increase in permits sold in the last three years could be due to more old guys staying in the field with crossbows or from the core of archers buying a second permit. Since the bonus permits went away you need a second permit for a second deer and a second archery permit costs the same as a season choice permit, is statewide, and would let you "pop" that big buck if he happened to walk by.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Nebraska Guy
    replied
    Took awhile but from a bunch of old Big Game Guides

    Archery Only
    Year...……..Permits Sold...…...Harvest...…….Percentage
    2006...……..15606...…………..4596...………..29%
    2007......…...16067...…………..4858...………..30%
    2008...……..16350...…………..7440...………...46%.....All Archery Permits Include Bonus AO Whitetail Permit
    2009...……..17265...…………..7612...………...44%.....All Archery Permits Include Bonus AO Whitetail Permit
    2010...……..15609...…………..6315...………...45%.....All Archery Permits Include Bonus AO Whitetail Permit
    2011...……..16413...…………..7029...………...43%.....All Archery Permits With Bonus AO & Crossbows Legal During Archery
    2012
    2013
    2014
    2015....…….17477...…………..4134...………...24%
    2016...……..17323...…………..4027...………...23%
    2017...……..16998...…………..4113...………...24%


    With more digging I might be able to fill in the blanks. If you have them you can quote and edit to fill them in. It won't bother me.
    Last edited by Old Nebraska Guy; 12-18-2018, 12:19 PM. Reason: edit to line up columns.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luv2Decoy
    replied
    I only know one X bow hunter so not a representative sample size but he has never wounded a deer while I know several bow hunters and they ALL have stories of a deer that they hit and didn't recover. There are many bow hunters who now think, that the effective range of their bow is 60-65 yards.

    With the new technology in compounds, the differences between the 2 has dwindled down to ease of shooting. Most new compounds shoot at a greater fps than a Xbow.

    I am just an interested by-stander in this battle as I use a rifle exclusively.

    Leave a comment:


  • fishcatcher
    commented on 's reply
    I wonder if archers have 4 months to hunt because its more difficult?

  • mkirk
    commented on 's reply
    I'm switching to x bow because I just don't have the time to practice like I used to. I still enjoy my compound but honestly an x bow may provide a cleaner kill so I'm all for it.

  • tjm
    replied
    Originally posted by LoveTheOutdoors View Post
    " (Field and Stream had an article in their recent issue that painted the impact of crossbows in a not so flattering light)..
    I read the article and have a theory as to why as to why Nebraska hasn’t seen what Ohio has seen. I would guess Nebraska rifle hunters haven’t felt the need to switch to archery hunting due to the rifle season being in the middle of November, ironically something many archery hunters rail against. Archery hunters may want to be careful of what they wish for.
    I did think the last paragraph was the most interesting. It’s not the younger generation turning to crossbows, it’s the older generation.
    Having hunted with both, I prefer my compound over the crossbow. I personally enjoy shooting and the practice it takes to be proficient.

    Leave a comment:


  • LoveTheOutdoors
    replied
    Originally posted by Old Nebraska Guy View Post
    tjm posted
    Per the 2008 Big game guide, 16,067 archery permits sold in 2007 with a success rate of 30 percent. Per the 2018 big game guide, 16,998 archery permits sold in 2017 with a success rate of 24 percent. I couldn’t find info for every year in between, but from my recollection, it hasn’t varied much over those years. I think it might have spiked one year when there was a bunch of bonus tags.

    I found...
    For 2015...17477 archery permits sold with a success rate of 24%.
    For 2016...17373 archery permits sold with a success rate of 23%

    Most permits before 2013 included a bonus permit. Then the 2012 EHD epidemic reduced the whitetail populations significantly and the bonus tags disappeard.

    If I go to my other computer I have a few more stored.

    On the surface it appears little or no impact (other than possibly a few more permits being sold, which isn't a bad thing); but I'd still be curious to dig into the numbers and see the breakout between crossbows and all other archery gear. I think it would answer the question, "are crossbow success rates more similar to rifles, or more similar to other archery weapons?" (Field and Stream had an article in their recent issue that painted the impact of crossbows in a not so flattering light). And for the record, I have no issues with crossbows, it's allowed my dad to extend his season as he never shot traditional/compound bows, but was willing to give a crossbow a try (I'm just a "data" guy, and like the numbers to tell the story/answer the questions).

    I can't remember, do the NGPC annual permit surveys ask that question (what weapon used, and do they breakout the archery gear)? Maybe they already have a general idea by extrapolating out the sample survey results.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Nebraska Guy
    replied

    tjm posted
    Per the 2008 Big game guide, 16,067 archery permits sold in 2007 with a success rate of 30 percent. Per the 2018 big game guide, 16,998 archery permits sold in 2017 with a success rate of 24 percent. I couldn’t find info for every year in between, but from my recollection, it hasn’t varied much over those years. I think it might have spiked one year when there was a bunch of bonus tags.

    I found...
    For 2015...17477 archery permits sold with a success rate of 24%.
    For 2016...17373 archery permits sold with a success rate of 23%

    Most permits before 2013 included a bonus permit. Then the 2012 EHD epidemic reduced the whitetail populations significantly and the bonus tags disappeard.

    If I go to my other computer I have a few more stored.

    Leave a comment:


  • 10_point_buck
    commented on 's reply
    Awesome response Elkstalkr. I too live in the city, have two very busy teenagers and live 110 miles away from my farm. There are only so many hours available for “my time”

  • elkstalkr
    commented on 's reply
    I just like hunting with a crossbow. It’s more fun to me. I switched from a regular bow to crossbow. I shot a couple deer with my crossbow and liked it so much I knew I would never pick up my vertical bow again.

    There are definitely some disadvantages to them. But overall I just enjoy shooting them more. They are just more fun to me. Don’t know why. Can’t explain it. Just a personal choice.

    I will say one thing I love about my crossbow is I can sight the bow in at the beginning of season and not have to shoot or practice with it the whole season. It’s ready to go when I am. I’m a 40 year old dad with two teenagers and honestly between all the soccer games, practices, and other events it’s tough to find the time AND the place (I live in the city) to practice enough to stay proficient with it. I get all the thrill of bowhunting with my crossbow with a lot less time at the range! Which I like a lot.
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