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    #16
    I feel that the full moon, high water/watershed and the cooler temps prob hurt the fishing that day. Wanahoo gets a ton of pressure, those bass prob just locked up. Those kayak tourneys in the past were in July/Aug time frame. This championship was in sept. The fall can be challenging, I know it fished well during prefish for most but locked up on Sat. I think it happens. When we go into summer fall transition, I found that the lake locks up tight for a week or two. It happens. Wait a few years and I think Wanahoo bounces bask.
    Jewel Jigs/Optimum Frogs #1/Hobie PA 12/Ranger Boats
    Small Boat Bass Club(AOY 2013/2014)/MoKan(AOY 2016)
    2016 Midwest Kayak Series Champ - AOY
    (Midwest) Club level Tourneys (2013-2016) 61 total
    - 18 Wins
    - 31 Top 3 Finishes
    - 50 Top 5 Finishes

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      #17
      With the abundance of GSF and all the sub 14 bass caught lately hope you're right. But you could catch a bass in a mud hole with no fish in it. Ha ha

      Comment


        #18
        Largemouth Bass Virus?
        You seen any dead bass?

        Also, see my previous post.

        Daryl B.

        Daryl Bauer
        Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
        Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
        [email protected]
        http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

        Comment


        • Kenai King
          Kenai King commented
          Editing a comment
          2 dead carp 1 dead small lmb

        • Shorty
          Shorty commented
          Editing a comment
          A few, likely C & R morts.

        #19
        Wanahoo seemed (to me) to be a longer than normal boom period if that's the problem. Got my hopes up. As numbers decrease, so should the pressure. Good to hear about the pike numbers. Good to hear reports of nice sized crappie and bluegill at times. If mother nature would calm down for a few years, I'm sure it will rebound.
        Mike - LaVista, NE

        Comment


          #20
          Daryl what is your take on all the GSF ?

          Comment


            #21
            Originally posted by Kenai King View Post
            Daryl what is your take on all the GSF ?
            Been a lot of water come into Wanahoo this past year. Lots of fish moving, lots of things changing.

            Daryl B.
            Daryl Bauer
            Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
            Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
            [email protected]
            http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

            Comment


              #22
              Green Sunfish Gloom and Doom.

              https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/77079

              A few nights ago somewhere out there on the internet I read that fluctuating water levels were more favorable to green sunfish and pumkinseed reproduction and recruitment, and that stable water levels more favorable to bluegill. I will see if I can find the source, "if it's on the internet it must be true" according to President Abe Lincoln.
              Sometimes it's fun to just sit back and watch the circus.....

              Comment


                #23
                Kenai King, I just wanted to thank you for a very thoughtful and considered post (and follow-up comments). Of course, even though I live in Omaha, I don't fish Wanahoo, not going to start, and rarely fish for LMB.

                But I have two distinct rules that are sort of besides the point, if you are a serious/competition oriented fisherman, but totally applicable to ... the rest of us.

                Rule 1: Fish for the hot bite, or fish for what is biting. Now, I know you professionals will say, "But you should be able to catch fish any time, any condition." True, but that also makes it suck sometimes.

                Rule 2: Fish where everybody else isn't. That is the reason I've never fished Wanahoo.

                (I'm also a big fan of reading the water, and taking the hints the fish and the conditions give you, but I'm certain you bassers do the same).

                John

                Comment


                  #24
                  Thanks - yes we or at least I am very much in tune as to whats going on around me. Sometimes too much and it's hard to process. I crushed it Saturday - 72" going into Sunday. Still a small inch total but was sitting in second and had a massive lead on the majority of the field. My game plan worked like gold and I boated at least 12 bass. Sunday rolls around conditions completely different - I made some adjustments and went where I had success the day prior. Got one right away and then missed one - all on the same thing I used Saturday. Got stubborn and stuck with it too long - it's hard dropping what has worked. Started scrambling - got out of my zone and groove - could not get it back. Got more worried about the clock than fishing. Ended up scratching one more out but at that time I was already defeated mentally and couldn't recover my mojo. It happens. Ended up getting fifth overall so not too shabby.

                  But normally when I have or had an epic day out there it's 18's and 19's I'm crushing not 12's 14's 16's and it happens less frequently.

                  Sure the skunks are there from time to time - the difficult days and such, but I have noticed a slow decline. I hope it does rebound.

                  Comment


                    #25
                    I have no problem with fishing contests, but it sounds like the opposite reason most of us go fishing. That is to relax and enjoy the company of fishing buddies, soak in the outdoors, and maybe bring home a few fish to eat. Just sayin'...

                    Comment


                      #26
                      A few more thoughts on Wanahoo.

                      We have electrofished Wanahoo for bass every year since it has opened. This survey takes place in the spring, in May each year. Yes, the density has declined as the fishery has developed but don't let that alarm you. When we survey a fishery for largemouth bass, anything over 200 bass/hour of electrofishing is considered a high density fishery and when we electrofished Wanahoo last May (in 2019), the bass density was just shy of 300 bass/hour. Also, many of those fish we sampled were over 15". This has been brought up before that recruitment is lacking at Wanahoo, however when a fishery is dominated by large fish, like Wanahoo, we likely aren't going to sample many smaller fish. Those larger fish are going to be in the habitats where we sample. The smaller fish are typically there, we just aren't very effective at sampling them. One more note on our bass electrofishing surveys, this is true for the surveys we do at all our reservoirs. We have stations that we sample every year, so the samples are comparable from year to year. We don't go out and keep electrofishing until find what we want to find, that would not be very scientific, but sample the set stations and see what we catch from them and that is a representative sample from the reservoir bass population.

                      As far as pressure goes, a couple years ago we had UNL do a creel survey at Wanahoo. The creel clerks interviewed angler about what they were catching and how long they had been fishing. This ran from April-October. What we found was there were more hours spent fishing Wanahoo (115,092 hours) than Pawnne (32,860 hours), Sherman (92,273 hours), Calamus (86,660 hours) and Harlan (114,242 hours). I think everyone on here will realize all those reservoirs except Pawnee are significantly larger than Wanahoo, but Wanahoo received more angling hours than all of them. Keep in mind, this creel and these estimates did NOT include the ice fishing season either.

                      Another thing about pressure, specifically pressure on bass is the number of tournaments held at Wanahoo. Over the past 5 years there have been an average of 23 tournaments/year at Wanahoo, primarily of which are bass tournaments (there are 1 or 2 multi-species tournaments/year out there too). The reservoir with the second most tournaments in the state is Big Mac, with an average of 15/year, but keep in mind these range from walleye, bass and multi-species. Wanahoo gets pounded with tournaments fishing for bass. And not the small bass, but targeting the big bass. I'm not sure what effect this may or may not have on the fishery but it definitely stand outs when looking at our tournament data.

                      Just a few notes and thoughts that came to mind as I read though this thread.

                      Jordan
                      Fisheries Biologist
                      NGPC
                      402-471-7651
                      [email protected]
                      Jordan Katt
                      Fisheries Biologist - SE District
                      Nebraska Game and Parks Commission
                      402-471-7651
                      [email protected]

                      Comment


                      • creekychub
                        creekychub commented
                        Editing a comment

                      • fjdiv
                        fjdiv commented
                        Editing a comment
                        THANKS!

                      #27
                      Originally posted by pelican View Post
                      I have no problem with fishing contests, but it sounds like the opposite reason most of us go fishing. That is to relax and enjoy the company of fishing buddies, soak in the outdoors, and maybe bring home a few fish to eat. Just sayin'...
                      I do all that too. Especially ice fishing, I do not compete. 5 years ago just wanted to test myself up against the best in the region. I did very well. I continued and still do. It has made me a much better angler and I am still learning and getting better at age fifty and I started fishing at 2. My tournament season is only 6 months out of the year and the other 6 months I enjoy chasing other species and trying to beat personal bests. When you can find that fine line between having fun and the stress it can be exhilarating when we accomplish our goals. When all of our hard works pays off and get paid for it - it is all worth it. I am a fierce competitor. I needed an outlet to test my skills other than kicking my family and friends butts all the time. Tournament fishing has also humbled me and shrunk my ego down to a manageable size and have met tons of great people and accomplished anglers nation wide. But I do understand your comment. I was in your boat 5 years ago. Believe me I soak in the outdoors more than most. My favorite time is meditating in my kayak under the rising sun before each and every tournament. I thank the spirits for my opportunities and thank them for the beautiful outdoors.

                      Comment


                        #28
                        Thanks Jordan you are a gentlemen and a scholar. Appreciate the time spent in your response.

                        Comment


                          #29
                          Kenai King has pointed out what many anglers have observed over the last two years: a rapid decline in the number of quality bass. Wanahoo is the heaviest pressured lake per acre in the state because of the quantity and quality of fish in the lake. The main species for most of the pressure were panfish and largemouth bass with some pressure for other species in the lake. If the quality of bass have declined, so has the lake as a destination for bass. I personally have rarely targeted Wanahoo for bass this year because of the decline.

                          What caused the decline? I do not know. I hope the biologists can determine why and hopefully prevent the decline in future new lakes. Hopefully Wanahoo recovers as a bass fishery. Obviously a lake with quality fishing near major populations can motivate many people to buy licenses and other needs for fishing the lake. I still target the lake for the quality panfish and hope the lake can sustain itself in that realm.

                          I applaud and appreciate the efforts the Game and Parks has put into the lakes in the state to enhance the quality of fishing available. I look forward to many more days spent on the water.

                          Comment


                            #30
                            Originally posted by JKATT View Post
                            A few more thoughts on Wanahoo.

                            We have electrofished Wanahoo for bass every year since it has opened. This survey takes place in the spring, in May each year. Yes, the density has declined as the fishery has developed but don't let that alarm you. When we survey a fishery for largemouth bass, anything over 200 bass/hour of electrofishing is considered a high density fishery and when we electrofished Wanahoo last May (in 2019), the bass density was just shy of 300 bass/hour. Also, many of those fish we sampled were over 15". This has been brought up before that recruitment is lacking at Wanahoo, however when a fishery is dominated by large fish, like Wanahoo, we likely aren't going to sample many smaller fish. Those larger fish are going to be in the habitats where we sample. The smaller fish are typically there, we just aren't very effective at sampling them. One more note on our bass electrofishing surveys, this is true for the surveys we do at all our reservoirs. We have stations that we sample every year, so the samples are comparable from year to year. We don't go out and keep electrofishing until find what we want to find, that would not be very scientific, but sample the set stations and see what we catch from them and that is a representative sample from the reservoir bass population.

                            As far as pressure goes, a couple years ago we had UNL do a creel survey at Wanahoo. The creel clerks interviewed angler about what they were catching and how long they had been fishing. This ran from April-October. What we found was there were more hours spent fishing Wanahoo (115,092 hours) than Pawnne (32,860 hours), Sherman (92,273 hours), Calamus (86,660 hours) and Harlan (114,242 hours). I think everyone on here will realize all those reservoirs except Pawnee are significantly larger than Wanahoo, but Wanahoo received more angling hours than all of them. Keep in mind, this creel and these estimates did NOT include the ice fishing season either.

                            Another thing about pressure, specifically pressure on bass is the number of tournaments held at Wanahoo. Over the past 5 years there have been an average of 23 tournaments/year at Wanahoo, primarily of which are bass tournaments (there are 1 or 2 multi-species tournaments/year out there too). The reservoir with the second most tournaments in the state is Big Mac, with an average of 15/year, but keep in mind these range from walleye, bass and multi-species. Wanahoo gets pounded with tournaments fishing for bass. And not the small bass, but targeting the big bass. I'm not sure what effect this may or may not have on the fishery but it definitely stand outs when looking at our tournament data.

                            Just a few notes and thoughts that came to mind as I read though this thread.

                            Jordan
                            Fisheries Biologist
                            NGPC
                            402-471-7651
                            [email protected]
                            whitetips give this man a raise!!!
                            Every mistake is a learning opportunity!

                            Comment

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