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NGPC Fishing Release: Aquatic Habitat Project at Valentine NWR begins second phase

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  • NGPC Fishing Release: Aquatic Habitat Project at Valentine NWR begins second phase

    LINCOLN, Neb. – In preparation for a rotenone treatment in 2018, length limits on largemouth bass and northern pike at Pelican Lake will be rescinded Dec. 1 through Aug. 1, 2018. This action begins the second phase of the Valentine National Wildlife Refuge Aquatic Habitat Project. Pelican Lake anglers may harvest these bass and pike …

    The post Aquatic Habitat Project at Valentine NWR begins second phase appeared first on NEBRASKALand Magazine.



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  • #2
    Trophy bluegill !! Thank you this will be awesome !!

    Comment


    • #3
      I sure hope they will still stock PIKE!!!!! Us guy's in eastern Ne.can get all the bluegill and green carp fishing you want I go out there for the pike!

      Comment


      • viasandhillgill
        viasandhillgill commented
        Editing a comment
        Dewey Clear and Willow will have Pike the rest will be pan fish lakes.

      • Jthod
        Jthod commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree. I don't make the 6 hour drive out there a few times a year to catch bass.

      • DavidC
        DavidC commented
        Editing a comment
        +1 for an emphasis on good pike fishing.

    • #4
      monster monster pike up there... hope they transfer some

      Comment


      • #5
        So if I read this right, at the end of 2020 there will no longer be any 40+ trophy pike in the refuge. I'm sure this was planned years ago, and if so why didn't they fix the regs where one over 40 could be taken along with the 28 inchers. We had trips up there where we couldn't hardly catch one down to 28. What are they planning for those big-uns in there. I would sure hate to see a bunch of them go belly up. Pan fish are all over Nebraska, not so much for the big Northerns.

        Comment


        • viasandhillgill
          viasandhillgill commented
          Editing a comment
          They have lifted the size restrictions for bass and pike on pelican. I'm sure they will do the same for Hackberry, Dewey, and Clear when they rotenone them. Limits have not changed.

      • #6
        I agree that it will be hard not to have pelican be the place to go to catch pike, but I also understand that game and parks must see into the future of these lakes and have the knowledge that action needs to be taken. Pike are prolific and fast growing hopefully the lakes that they have them in will be able to handle the pressure they will receive.

        Comment


        • #7
          Originally posted by Pikr50 View Post
          So if I read this right, at the end of 2020 there will no longer be any 40+ trophy pike in the refuge. I'm sure this was planned years ago, and if so why didn't they fix the regs where one over 40 could be taken along with the 28 inchers. We had trips up there where we couldn't hardly catch one down to 28. What are they planning for those big-uns in there. I would sure hate to see a bunch of them go belly up. Pan fish are all over Nebraska, not so much for the big Northerns.
          Northern pike will continue to be part of the fisheries management plan for the Valentine Refuge after the rotenone renovations, that is addressed in the news release. There likely will be some different pike regulations in place following the renovations as well.

          Pike in those habitats grow very fast and that will be even more so following renovations. It will not be long and there will be big pike available again.

          Daryl B.
          Daryl Bauer
          Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
          Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
          daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
          http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

          Comment


          • #8
            Very sad to see something so many enjoy going away. I have enjoyed several trips every year to Pelican to catch pike since I was a kid. I remember the days of trophy gills in Pelican with pike in there. What was so wrong with the formula before? Wasn't pressure and over fishing what fished out Pelican of the trophy gills in the first place? With Pelican getting bluegills, black crappie, and yellow perch what will manage the pan fish populations?

            Plenty of other places in the state to catch bluegills and I understand the carp need to go buy why the pike too? I can say I wont be making several trips a year for bluegill no matter the size and I'm sure I'm not the only one. It was always nice to have several lakes with the potential of big pike to disburse the pressure but I can't say I understand the reasoning for ruining the best one.

            So many questions and no clear answers. It is pretty funny to have 5 boat launch areas on a pan fish lake.

            Comment


            • viasandhillgill
              viasandhillgill commented
              Editing a comment
              I hope there are alot more fishermen that think like you do!!!!

            • RocketFishing
              RocketFishing commented
              Editing a comment
              I hope so too. If there were there would be a lot less fishing meeting the knife. Catch. Picture. Release. I keep my pan fishing to times when the water is hard.

          • #9
            Believe it or not, there are quite a few of us that have and will continue to drive 4+ hours to catch(and release) bluegills of the quality that is and will be produced from those lakes.

            To each his own.

            This project can't get done soon enough in my opinion! The sooner the carp are gone (forever) the sooner the game fish can be reintroduced, the sooner they will get big.

            These are exciting times my friends!
            Last edited by swoab47; 12-06-2017, 01:34 PM.

            Comment


            • RocketFishing
              RocketFishing commented
              Editing a comment
              I don't have to drive that far to catch 10" gills. You don't either in Seward. If you want to drive an hour I'll put you on some and save you the extra trip time.

          • #10
            Originally posted by RocketFishing View Post
            Very sad to see something so many enjoy going away. I have enjoyed several trips every year to Pelican to catch pike since I was a kid. I remember the days of trophy gills in Pelican with pike in there. What was so wrong with the formula before? Wasn't pressure and over fishing what fished out Pelican of the trophy gills in the first place? With Pelican getting bluegills, black crappie, and yellow perch what will manage the pan fish populations?

            Plenty of other places in the state to catch bluegills and I understand the carp need to go buy why the pike too? I can say I wont be making several trips a year for bluegill no matter the size and I'm sure I'm not the only one. It was always nice to have several lakes with the potential of big pike to disburse the pressure but I can't say I understand the reasoning for ruining the best one.

            So many questions and no clear answers. It is pretty funny to have 5 boat launch areas on a pan fish lake.
            We have years of research on Nebraska's sandhill lakes including especially lakes on the Valentine NWR. We learned a lot from that research, more than I can mention on some on-line forum. However, some highlights I will mention here. One is that common carp reduce productivity, productivity for all other fish, productivity for waterfowl, productivity for everything. Carp numbers at Pelican are reaching the point where growth rates and body condition of panfish have declined; they are having a negative impact on that fishery now, and it ain't gonna get better. Another thing we know is that northern pike can help control carp numbers, but they also impact every other species in the community including panfish. The last one I will mention is that we learned our sandhill lakes are incredibly productive, so productive that predators are not the "managers" of panfish populations like they are in other waters--weather conditions impact panfish dynamics in sandhill lakes more so than predators, and healthy predator populations are not needed to "control" panfish in those incredibly productive waters like they are needed in other habitats.

            With current technology and improvements, we believe we have an opportunity to attack common carp on the Valentine Refuge on a scale that has never been attempted. If successful, the fisheries potential without common carp in those waters is through the roof. Pelican in particular has demonstrated that it can produce world class trophy bluegill and without common carp it could do that even more than it ever has.

            But, of course we are always in the business of trying to keep an infinite variety of anglers happy with a variety of fishing opportunities. Northern pike will continue to be part of the Valentine Refuge fisheries in the future, and again, without common carp, those fisheries could be better than ever as well.

            I am here, here all the time, you got questions, I got answers.

            Daryl B.
            Daryl Bauer
            Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
            Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
            daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
            http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

            Comment


            • #11
              I hope this is as good as advertised! The carp are certainly a problem that needs to go away and I am excited there is a plan for it. I hate to see the lake options for pike fishing become fewer. In my opinion, pike fishing is the driving force for most patrons who fish there during the open water season. Time will tell with how this shakes out when completed. In the mean time, it will be a blast to take out some of the hog pike that are in there before the treatments. It just makes me nervous for what the pike fishing will be like, in 3 to 5 years, as compared to current state with multiple lake options. I suppose my group will start learning some of the other lakes in the area for our pike fishing. What will be exciting is to have a few lakes for perch fishing, those little devils are delicious!

              I hope the NGPC has this right and knock it out of the park with their plan.

              Comment


              • #12
                This is great news and I am in agreeance..........it cannot happen fast enough to be rebuilt and bring back those plate sized bull Bluegill that first brought Dave Genz and Clam flip over to Nebraska so many years ago! I also remind all the pike fisherman there is a little reservoir up the road called "Merritt Reservoir" where there are big Pike and big Muskie and a little bit of all gamefish including trophy Catfish. So NGP use that sampling history and knowledge to eliminate the rough fish and make that Gem a trophy producer!

                Comment


                • Jthod
                  Jthod commented
                  Editing a comment
                  While Merritt is one of my favorite lakes to fish, it certainly doesn't compare to the pike fishing in the refuge lakes for me.

              • #13
                Originally posted by whitetips View Post

                We have years of research on Nebraska's sandhill lakes including especially lakes on the Valentine NWR. We learned a lot from that research, more than I can mention on some on-line forum. However, some highlights I will mention here. One is that common carp reduce productivity, productivity for all other fish, productivity for waterfowl, productivity for everything. Carp numbers at Pelican are reaching the point where growth rates and body condition of panfish have declined; they are having a negative impact on that fishery now, and it ain't gonna get better. Another thing we know is that northern pike can help control carp numbers, but they also impact every other species in the community including panfish. The last one I will mention is that we learned our sandhill lakes are incredibly productive, so productive that predators are not the "managers" of panfish populations like they are in other waters--weather conditions impact panfish dynamics in sandhill lakes more so than predators, and healthy predator populations are not needed to "control" panfish in those incredibly productive waters like they are needed in other habitats.

                With current technology and improvements, we believe we have an opportunity to attack common carp on the Valentine Refuge on a scale that has never been attempted. If successful, the fisheries potential without common carp in those waters is through the roof. Pelican in particular has demonstrated that it can produce world class trophy bluegill and without common carp it could do that even more than it ever has.

                But, of course we are always in the business of trying to keep an infinite variety of anglers happy with a variety of fishing opportunities. Northern pike will continue to be part of the Valentine Refuge fisheries in the future, and again, without common carp, those fisheries could be better than ever as well.

                Daryl B.
                "our sandhill lakes are incredibly productive, so productive that predators are not the "managers" of panfish populations like they are in other waters"
                Wouldn't this mean pike can still be part of the community without completely disrupting the pan fish populations in Pelican? Or at the very least Largemouth Bass?

                Everyone here is pulling for you guys and wants you to succeed and knock the carp out of the park That makes fishing better for all.

                I am fully aware you cant please all fisherman and if you try you are sure to fail and end up pleasing no one.

                Comment


                • #14
                  Originally posted by RocketFishing View Post

                  "our sandhill lakes are incredibly productive, so productive that predators are not the "managers" of panfish populations like they are in other waters"
                  Wouldn't this mean pike can still be part of the community without completely disrupting the pan fish populations in Pelican? Or at the very least Largemouth Bass?

                  Everyone here is pulling for you guys and wants you to succeed and knock the carp out of the park That makes fishing better for all.

                  I am fully aware you cant please all fisherman and if you try you are sure to fail and end up pleasing no one.
                  I also said, "Another thing we know is that northern pike can help control carp numbers, but they also impact every other species in the community including panfish."

                  Yes, obviously northern pike can be part of the community and management without "completely" disrupting panfish populations, but they do have an impact. Largemouth bass absolutely will be part and do not have the same impact that pike do.

                  Daryl B.
                  Daryl Bauer
                  Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
                  Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
                  daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
                  http://ourdoornebraska.ne.gov/blogs/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

                  Comment


                  • #15
                    Originally posted by whitetips View Post

                    I also said, "Another thing we know is that northern pike can help control carp numbers, but they also impact every other species in the community including panfish."

                    Yes, obviously northern pike can be part of the community and management without "completely" disrupting panfish populations, but they do have an impact. Largemouth bass absolutely will be part and do not have the same impact that pike do.

                    Daryl B.
                    Bass will be part of the stocked fish post renovation on Pelican? That makes this much better. Reading the Aquatic Habitat Project release it seemed bass would not be included.

                    "Plans are to manage Duck, Rice, Watts, West Long, Pelican, and Hackberry lakes for quality panfish fishing, with an emphasis on bluegill, black crappie and yellow perch. Pelican will be managed for trophy bluegill. Dewey, Clear and Willow lakes will be stocked with bluegill, yellow perch, black crappie, largemouth bass and northern pike."

                    Comment


                    • whitetips
                      whitetips commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Largemouth bass, yes, absolutely with the panfish.

                      Daryl B.

                    • RocketFishing
                      RocketFishing commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Good to hear!
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