Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Basic musky set up

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question: Basic musky set up

    Thinking about targeting musky a few trips this year to check off of my bucket list. It seems like a few members chase these toothy creatures often.

    What is a basic set up that I could use both on a boat and bank? Everything from rod action to line size is appreciated. Thanks in advanced for any responses!
    "There's no WiFi in the forest, but chances are you'll find a better connection."

  • #2
    If your boat is a deep v and the bow sits pretty high out of the water you might not find a rod that will fish great on shore and in a boat. For a boat that sits high in the water you'll want a rod that is long enough (7'-8') that you can figure 8 comfortably without having to hang over the side of the boat. For a shore rod, you'll want a short enough rod (6'-7') that you wont smack the tip into the dirt when you're working the lure. I use a 7'6" and I might be too short if I'm in a tall enough boat yet on shore I'm looking for tall banks or something to stand on so I can get the sharp twitches that I'm looking for without hitting the sand. You can try to work the rod off to the side but its harder to get the quick inertia into baits like you can when your working the rod downward. If you can, try to go out a few times with someone that has a good selection to try. Then you can maybe see what you want certain baits to do and what rods will work best for you whether in a boat or on shore and maybe find a compromise that works for you. Also, maybe PM muskiegirl or her brother for info. They've been very open and knowledgeable with ski info not only to me but many others on this site. Good luck!
    I love catching bass. Every MA is like a participation trophy from mother nature!

    Comment


    • #3
      Also, plan on using at least a 7" lure as most of our muskie waters are shad based forage and you'll usually need those big baits to activate the bigger muskies. If I just use the bigger end of bass lures I don't get as many strikes or follows from 28" fish or larger.
      I love catching bass. Every MA is like a participation trophy from mother nature!

      Comment


      • #4
        7'-8' Heavy rod, NOT a 7'6" Bass rod, you want a real musky rod. My first dedicated rod was a 8'1" XH. WAY too much rod for most baits I use. Generally I use a 7' Cabelas Tourney Trail. If you want to throw 4oz+ baits, then the XH may be for you.

        6.x:1 ratio reel. Reel wise, If you want a basic setup, an Abu Garcia Ambassador C3. A little higher end, 13 Fishing A3, Abu Garcia Revo Toro (discontinued but still a lot around)

        -80lb braid. Brand is up to you.

        -good leaders, with quality clasps. I will use wire or 125lb flouro, depending on the waters.


        The death of many pike in Wanahaoo during the summer come from bass anglers inadvertently (or not) hooking into a 35-40" pike, and playing it too long. They are cool water fish, and when the water temps are in the upper 70s, they have be killed very easily. The same issue can be found in musky in the heat of the summer. I know of one case in Fremont last year. The 'angler' stated that he liked using light gear for the musky because they were more fun to catch that way. The lake is short one adult musky because of it.


        Get them in quick, handled properly, and released safely.


        In addition to the catching gear, you'll also want to look into for handling gear:

        LARGE net
        LONG pliers
        Hook cutters (cheap bolt cutters at Menards)
        gloves
        safe measuring devise, soft tape works well.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's awesome that you want to get into musky fishing and I'm happy you are asking for advice instead of just jumping into it. Everyone needs a starting point and advice is free.

          As far a rod I'd suggest 8’6 XH, it's a good all around rod that will let you throw most baits and have good backbone for the hooksets. If you are looking for a cheaper priced but still good rod I'd suggest looking into Tackle Industries, Tooth Tamer, Okuma or Shimano.

          For reels I'd say you can't go wrong with Abu or Shimano, but for reels you really do get what you pay for. The revo toro S is great for price if dont wanna spend too much. I personally love the Abu Beast. The low profile is amazing on your joints and hands after casting nonstop for hours on end. Otherwise if you are looking for a little cheaper Diawa lexa or okuma are cheaper and pretty good.

          For line I'd say 80 - 100 lb cortland or spiderwire.

          For a leader 130 stealth tackle floro leader for 90% of lures. Straight wire for jerkbaits and WTD topwaters. Longer leaders for trolling and can go heaver than 130 if throwin big rubber. If you'd like you could maybe go down to 100 for lighter stuff but wouldnt go less than that, you risk bite off from big fish.

          If you do plan on bank fishing just a friendly reminder to not lay the fish down on the bank. Get a large net and keep it in the water while you take out the hooks and be sure to keep her head in the water while trying to get out hooks. Get some long pilers (Joe Buchers are nice), hook cutters, jaw spreaders in case she inhales the bait and a pair of safety gloves for yourself because you never know when she will thrash. After all that take your pictures if you can stop shaking long enough from the insane adrenaline rush you just got and put her back. When releasing make sure that if you are in a boat the waves are goin into its face or if you are drifting that its got water going into its face, don't drift with it on the back side of boat so water goes in backwards on her. That could drown her out. When releasing don't push her forward and back to get her to go. That does the same thing too.

          If you have any other questions feel free to PM me or join Muskies Inc and you will have a wealth of knowledge at your finger tips.

          Good luck I hope you get a monster!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Let me preface this by saying I do not fish for muskies in Nebraska, I fish them for 3 weeks when I go see family in Canada on lake of the woods. Once you fish there, working your tail off for a shot at a mid 30" fish just doesn't sound appealing. Anyway, I have 3 muskie setups. The first is a 7'11" heavy fast action fenwick flipping stick paired with a abu revo sx with 65# braid. It's a great rod for throwing rad dogs/cowgirls and oversized flukes which is what I throw 90% of the time. I can throw everything except 12" plugs on this rod. I also use this rod all year long. The other two set ups are 13 Omen musky rods which I love. One has an abu ambassador with 100lb power pro the other has a revo beast on it. Those two rods can handle anything a muskie could throw at you and I would highly recommend. But, I only use those two for 3 weeks out of the year and I use the flipping stick down here all year.
            Leaders I always use wire. I have been in a boat where a mid 40" fish sliced right through a floro leader rated for 125#
            I have also recently switched my line for muskie specific gear to white, when muskies feed, they look up and all of the light comes from up so the white blends in against the sky/incoming light. Plus it helps you visually see how you are working walking and gliding baits
            Last edited by ethan; 03-20-2017, 09:40 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Some great info here. Love this site. Thank you all for your responses and advice!
              "There's no WiFi in the forest, but chances are you'll find a better connection."

              Comment


              • #8
                40lb+ Nebraska musky vs 125lb Flouro. Cut at least 1/3 of the way through, but it landed the fish.

                Comment


                • #9
                  For the money, you really can't beat the heaviest berkley lightning rod. The Heavy 7'6" version. Less than $50. It'll comfortably throw lures up to 3 oz. Field & stream did a torture test of bass "flipping sticks" and this was the only rod to survive. Pair with Abu Ambassador C3 with 65 pound power pro, again, best bang for $$. This is basically my setup, and I've caught a few muskies from shore. I would only recommend steel leaders.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I really appreciate the info here as well. I bought my first musky lures last year but was too chicken to use them as I didn't think I had the right gear. I've got the right rod and reel but wouldn't have had the right line so this thread is very helpful!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kcisar View Post
                      I really appreciate the info here as well. I bought my first musky lures last year but was too chicken to use them as I didn't think I had the right gear. I've got the right rod and reel but wouldn't have had the right line so this thread is very helpful!
                      First musky I ever caught was on a 6'6 medium heavy spinning rod with 20# braid on a shimanno Sahara. Was throwing double showgirls and a storm giant thunder stick. Not even close to ideal but you'd be surprised by what you can make work.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I spent money on every musky thing hyped in the In-Fisherman magazine in the late 80s, early 90s. I have a 6500 C3, and a 7'6 MH power hump combo, spooled with 40 lb dacron. A full set of Suicks, Bloop Bloops, Shimmy Shams, Hawg Wobblers and some yuuuge in line spinners

                        All that stuff is hanging on the wall.

                        Every musky I've hooked, every musky I've landed was on bass lures and tackle The fish I lost were because I didn't have a wire leader, not because my gear or technique couldn't handle it.
                        .
                        Medium heavy rod, 15-20 lb test, a 2.5 squarebill, and six to 8 inches of wire leader

                        You're fishing in Nebraska, not Minnesota. If you get too species specific, you'll miss out on other opportunities.
                        " A brave man likes the feel of nature on his face, Jack." - Wang Chi

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Your saying nebraska dosnt produce big muskie? In the last few years i have been seeing lots in the mid 40s seen in person a 51. Nebraska joined the myskie game not very long ago and it takes a long time to grow them into trophy fish. But our fish are getting in to the trophy range. If people care for them and release them id say in the next 5 to 10 years we start seeing 50" a lot more.
                          Ya you can land a muskie on bass gear. But use gear intended for the fish. There is nothing worse than killing a big fish just so you could have a long (fun) fight or losing the fish of a lifetime because you didnt think muskie gear was needed.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Fish365 View Post
                            Your saying nebraska dosnt produce big muskie? In the last few years i have been seeing lots in the mid 40s seen in person a 51. Nebraska joined the myskie game not very long ago and it takes a long time to grow them into trophy fish. But our fish are getting in to the trophy range. If people care for them and release them id say in the next 5 to 10 years we start seeing 50" a lot more.
                            Ya you can land a muskie on bass gear. But use gear intended for the fish. There is nothing worse than killing a big fish just so you could have a long (fun) fight or losing the fish of a lifetime because you didnt think muskie gear was needed.
                            I'm not doubting that Merritt and some other big reservoirs have big girls, but for the majority people that live in the eastern half of the state who are going to go to a metro lake to cross a species off a bucket list, expecting a 50+ isn't realistic. Heck, even on Mille lacs or lake of the woods, 50's are fairly rare.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X