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Thread: WD 40 Gun cleaner/lubricant

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    Default WD 40 Gun cleaner/lubricant

    Curious to hear opinions on WD 40 as a gun cleaner/lubricant.

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    I would stick to gun oil.

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    WD is a good penetrant and water displacement, but not worth a hoot as a lube, try Tri Flow.
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    Rem-oil

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    Quote Originally Posted by optprime View Post
    Curious to hear opinions on WD 40 as a gun cleaner/lubricant.
    Absolutely worthless!! Use a good oil intended for guns. As far as cleaners go; for rifles I like Butch's Bore Shine for cleaning the barrel. When cleaning a shotgun I will just use Hoppes and Gun Scrubber in the spray can for getting gunk out of the hard to get areas.

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    Dont use that crap on guns! I like remoil for lubricant and mineral spirits to cleean my firearms.

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    I have been in the maintenance field for years and the only thing wd-40 should be used for is a mechanical device that has had water in it that can be removed with heat (lock or hinge). I have also used it for starting fires which it seems to excel at. If you want an easily applied inhibitor/lube I would suggest Break free or Rem oil type product. Wd-40 also works well to fog your outboard motor cylinders before winter storage and helps them start when bringing them out of storage much easier.

    Now if for some reason you drop your gun in water or you are in a rain storm and its the only thing available use it but when you get a chance wipe it down and put on the proper inhibitor/lube.

    I like to wipe my gun's down with Break free and wipe it all off and spray on a silicone based dry lube and it typically prevents rusting even if you are in a light rain all day. I do this each year before hunting and today seems like a good day to do just that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leupold View Post
    Wd-40 also works well to fog your outboard motor cylinders before winter storage and helps them start when bringing them out of storage much easier.
    Not so sure about that. By spraying WD in your cylinders you are not fogging them with oil, you are using a penetrant to wash the oil from your cylinder walls.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wirenut View Post
    Not so sure about that. By spraying WD in your cylinders you are not fogging them with oil, you are using a penetrant to wash the oil from your cylinder walls.
    I learned this from my dad who has been doing this since 1982 on our 150 Johnson outboard (it was recommended by the Monarch factory for winterizing the motor) and it is still running good and has not needed any engine repairs. I have also done this way every year to mine which is a 1988 35 Mercury and it has not ever caused a problem that I am aware of in the 21 years I have owned it. Im not recommending anyone else do it I was just telling one of my uses.

    I am not sure what you mean by a penatrant?

    Here are some WD-40 facts

    Function

    The long-term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface, providing lubrication and protection from moisture. This is diluted with a volatile hydrocarbon to give a low viscosity fluid which can be sprayed and thus get into crevices. The volatile hydrocarbon then evaporates, leaving the oil behind. A propellant (originally a low-molecular weight hydrocarbon, now carbon dioxide) provides gas pressure in the can to force the liquid through the spray nozzle, then itself diffuses away.
    These properties make the product useful in both home and commercial fields; lubricating and loosening joints and hinges, removing dirt and residue, extricating stuck screws and bolts, and preventing rust are common usages. The product also may be useful in displacing moisture.
    [edit] Formulation

    WD-40's formula is a trade secret. The product is not patented in order to avoid completely disclosing its ingredients.[2] WD-40's main ingredients, according to U.S. Material Safety Data Sheet information, are:


    The German version of the mandatory EU safety sheet lists the following safety-relevant ingredients:


    It further lists flammability and affects to the human skin when repeatedly exposed to WD-40 as risks when using WD-40. Nitrile rubber gloves and safety glasses should be used. Water is unsuitable for extinguishing burning WD-40.
    There is a popular urban legend that the key ingredient in WD-40 is fish oil.[3] However, the WD-40 web site states that it is a petroleum based product

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    Quote Originally Posted by elkstalkr View Post
    Rem-oil
    It's the best product available.

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    I would not use WD on a gun. After time it gets sticky, then you really have to clean it good to get stuff to function properly. I usually use some kind of Hoppes or rem oil on a gun. But if you want to get rusty bolts or anything else loose, I would use Kroil.

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    Great I have been using Rem oil but a good friend of mine uses a WD40. I was curious.
    My next question is: I have a older ithaca sidexside 20 ga. Compared to my newer browning shotgun, it seems that the blueing on the ithaca is a much duller almost gray. Is this how they applied the blueing "back in the day" or has much of its luster/shine worn off? My protocol after cleaning the the gun is to "hose" it down with rem oil. It seems when I do this there are certain parts on the barrels that seem to absorb the oil much quicker. THere are no rust spots currently on the gun, which is how I would like to keep it. What are your guys' thoughts on my protocol?

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    I am not sure what you mean by a penatrant?

    It says right on the back of the can: Penetrates

    From my own experiences, Coug is right on, it gums up and becomes sticky. Years ago we used it to 'lubricate' the rods on a foosball table; they were slick a snot for about 5 minutes till it evaporated, then you could hardly move them. IMO, the same would happen in a firearm.

    Here is an email I got a while back about it:


    WD-40
    I thought that you might like to know more about this well-known WD-40 product.

    When you read the "shower door" part, try it. It's the first thing that has cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as glass. It's a miracle!

    Then try it on your stovetop... Viola! It's now shinier than it's ever been. You'll be amazed.

    The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and de greaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a "Water Displacement" compound.
    They were successful with the Fortieth formulation, thus WD-40.


    The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their Atlas missile parts.

    The workers were so pleased with the product they began smuggling (also known as "shrinkage" or "stealing") it out to use at home.

    The executives decided there might be a consumer market for it and put it in aerosol cans. The rest is history. It is a carefully guarded recipe known only to four people. One of them is the "brew master." There are about 2.5 million gallons of the stuff manufactured each year. It gets its distinctive smell from a fragrance that is added to the brew. Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you.

    Here are a few of the 1000's of uses:

    ~Protects silver from tarnishing
    ~Cleans and lubricates guitar strings
    ~Gets oil spots off concrete driveways
    ~Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen without making it slippery
    ~Keeps flies off cows
    ~Restores and cleans chalkboards
    ~Removes lipstick stains
    ~Loosens stubborn zippers
    ~Untangles jewelry chains
    ~Removes stains from stainless steel sinks
    ~Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill
    ~Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing
    ~Removes tomato stains from clothing
    ~Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots
    ~Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors
    ~Keeps scissors working smoothly
    ~Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes
    ~Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide
    ~Lubricates gear shift and mower - deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers
    ~Rids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises
    ~Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open
    ~Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close
    ~Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards and vinyl bumpers
    ~Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles
    ~Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans
    ~Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons and bicycles for easy handling
    ~Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly
    ~Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools
    ~Removes splattered grease on stove
    ~Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging
    ~Lubricates prosthetic limbs
    ~Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell)
    ~Removes all traces of duct tape
    ~I have even heard of folks spraying it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain.

    ~Florida's favorite use was "cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers
    ~The favorite use in the state of New York

    ~ WD-40 protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
    ~WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. It's a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.
    ~Keeps away chiggers on the kids

    ~Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately, and stops the itch.
    ~WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and wipe with a clean rag.
    ~Also, if you've discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and re-wash. Presto! Lipstick is gone!
    ~If you sprayed WD-40 on the distributor cap, it would displace the moisture and allow the car to start.
    ~WD-40, long known for its ability to remove leftover tape smudges (sticky label tape), is also a lovely perfume and air freshener! Sprayed liberally on every hinge in the house, it leaves that distinctive clean fresh scent for up to two days!
    ~Seriously though, it removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor! Use WD-40 for those nasty tar and scuff marks on flooring. It doesn't seem to harm the finish and you won't have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off. Just remember to open some windows if you have a lot of marks.
    ~Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly! Use WD-40!


    I still don't buy the lubricates part, had an OLD can that did not have the word 'lubricates' on it anywhere, but all the new ones do.
    Cleaning Trash Fish FromThe Pit, One State Record At A Time

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    Another thing WD40 is good for is starting 2 cycle motors. Take out the spark plug spray in WD40 put plug back in, usually starts unless there is no spark.
    Blues 6 -10s, 1-11, 1-12, 5-15s, 1-16, 1-27, 1-30, 1-32, 1-46, 2-51s

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    Quote Originally Posted by optprime View Post
    Great I have been using Rem oil but a good friend of mine uses a WD40. I was curious.
    My next question is: I have a older ithaca sidexside 20 ga. Compared to my newer browning shotgun, it seems that the blueing on the ithaca is a much duller almost gray. Is this how they applied the blueing "back in the day" or has much of its luster/shine worn off? My protocol after cleaning the the gun is to "hose" it down with rem oil. It seems when I do this there are certain parts on the barrels that seem to absorb the oil much quicker. THere are no rust spots currently on the gun, which is how I would like to keep it. What are your guys' thoughts on my protocol?

    I have a 6-7year old rem. 870 supermag that is doing that too in a few spots (see the pic below, the barrel is nice and dark but the action area is losing it). I chalk it up to heavy use. I spay it down with Barricade after almost every hunt otherwise it will get rust spots (keep in mind it gets wet almost every trip).

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    I don't like to use WD-40 because I believe that it attracts dust.
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    Quote Originally Posted by flushmaster View Post
    I don't like to use WD-40 because I believe that it attracts dust.
    That's what I've noticed whenever I've used it. I've never used it on firearms, but when I've used it, it seems to get dust on it while it was still wet. It also never seemed to work for very long.

    For firearms, go with Rem oil or Hoppes products.

    I WOULD NOT spray WD-40 on any part of my skin. That's just asking for crap in your skin that shouldn't be there.
    Fishing trips aren't measured in pounds and inches; they're measured in smiles, laughter, and memories with friends and family.

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    Thanks for all the replies! Appreciate it.

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    Guess I'm the odd ball out.. I have used it before when my gun had grit and grim/sand in places I wasn't able to get to... I used the red nozzle and hit all the places and cleaned it thoruoughly and let it drained.. Then I hit it with normal gun oil on the receiver and moving parts... Still works today..

    Relatives had a gun fall out of an airboat decades ago and get river sand into it, took it back to the cabin dis-assembled it and hit it with WD-40 and then went back out on the river with the gun functioning. *shrugs* Might not be the best oil for cleaning but in a pinch better then nothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thumpper View Post
    Guess I'm the odd ball out.. I have used it before when my gun had grit and grim/sand in places I wasn't able to get to... I used the red nozzle and hit all the places and cleaned it thoruoughly and let it drained.. Then I hit it with normal gun oil on the receiver and moving parts... Still works today..

    Relatives had a gun fall out of an airboat decades ago and get river sand into it, took it back to the cabin dis-assembled it and hit it with WD-40 and then went back out on the river with the gun functioning. *shrugs* Might not be the best oil for cleaning but in a pinch better then nothing.
    Works fine in a pinch as you stated, but there are much better lubes on the market.
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