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kdf5
06-25-2008, 09:11 AM
My wife's family is having a reunion at Ft. Rob this weekend and I'd like to get a bit of fly fishing done. Does anyone have some knowledge of where to go, what to use, etc, while I'm up there? Any help in locating some ponds, lakes, streams would be appreciated. Thanks.

fish_finder
06-25-2008, 09:46 AM
I think Soldier creek has some trout in it. Haven't been up there for a long time though so maybe that creek isn't as good as it once was.

wneb.fisher
06-25-2008, 10:14 AM
Soldier Creek is a great place to catch trout. You can also find trout, bass and really tiny bluegill in the Grabel ponds which are east of the fort about 1/2 mile. Ther are some great fish in Carter P. Johnson Lake, Trout, Bass, Crappie. Be warned that the vegetation can get pretty thick around the creek so be prepared for ticks.

wneb.fisher
06-25-2008, 10:16 AM
I forgot to add that the White river flows right along the Fort. There are some nice fish in it too if you can find them. I worked at Fort Rob. for 2 summers so if ya have any other questions feel free to ask.

south of 41
06-25-2008, 10:41 AM
was there last week and fished the ponds 2 mile straight east of the fort :Fishing: Caught bass, gills and trout. saw some very big bass but only had access to my wifes uncle's fishing gear.

I was instructed this was not going to be a fishing vacation :mad:

Do the jeep ride (we saw a big horn sheep) and the chuck wagon cook out if you can:2thumbsup:

kdf5
06-25-2008, 10:54 AM
I plan on hiking/geocaching, fishing, and a 90 mile bike ride in preparation for the Triple Bypass in Colorado. Beyond that I plan on eating, drinking, swimming and goofing. The Chuckwagon is definately on the radar and tomorrow I'm smoking two Boston Butts to take along. All of this reminds me just how badly I hate working and how much fun I could have if only I could win the Powerball. :eusa_dance:

chad
06-25-2008, 01:04 PM
From Daryl

I wish you would have posted something sooner. We have a booklet, Trout Fishing in Nebraska's Streams that you need to see. That booklet highlights all of the cold-water, trout fisheries we have in the state, it has maps, directions, descriptions, "the whole nine yards". If you can find a copy of that it would show you several different trout streams in the Ft. Rob area. If you cannot find a copy and would like to have one (even though it may be too late for your weekend trip), just send me your U.S. Postal mailing address and I will put a couple copies in the mail for you.

One of my favorite fishing spots at Ft. Rob is the Soldier's Creek Wilderness Area northwest of the fort. You can walk in and fish both the south fork and the middle fork of Soldier's Creek on the Wilderness Area. The south fork has brook trout in it; the middle fork has browns and a few rainbows. Neither forks are very big, you will not be doing any double-haul casts; you will mostly be dipping and dabbling with a fly-rod, but I have certainly caught trout there on the fly rod.

I always tell fly-anglers that fly-fishing is NOT just fishing for trout. There are a number of ponds around Ft. Robinson that offer some excellent fishing for panfish, largemouth bass and some put-and-take rainbows. One of the best of those would be Carter P. Johnson Lake which is located on the same road northwest of the fort that leads to the Soldier's Creek Wilderness Area. Carter P. has a very good bass fishery, some rock bass and crappies and we stock catchable-size rainbows in there as well. There are also bass, bluegills and some catchable rainbows in the Grabel Ponds located southeast of the fort (down around the are where the P.O.W. camp used to be located).

That should give you some ideas of where to start. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.

Daryl Bauer
Lakes and Reservoirs Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@ngpc.ne.gov

P.S. Please feel free to share this message with others.

kdf5
06-25-2008, 01:25 PM
Here's Daryl's follow up to some of my questions:

Good, you have the Trout Fishing in Nebraska's Streams booklet. Here is what I always tell folks about the catchable rainbows we stock in waters all around the state--those trout have been raised all their lives in a fish hatchery. Their idea of survival is swimming around in a concrete raceway looking for pellets of feed to hit the surface of the water. Once they leave the hatchery and are stocked they will learn to feed on natural prey, but their behavior is still similar to what they did in the hatchery. They spend a lot of time cruising around, often cruising near drop-offs. They are very curious and will try a lot of different food items until they learn what to feed on.

The last stocking of catchable rainbows stocked in both Carter P. and the Grabel ponds was in May. The fishing for those catchable trout in those ponds is probably best in spring and fall, but you should still find some of them in there now. The area you have fished at Carter P. should be as good as any, the fishing pier/dock should have some trout around it too. I would think some nymph patterns would be worth a try because there should be some insect hatches of some type. Something with some flash and color, like the small spoons you have thrown before, will usually get some of those catchable rainbows to strike as well. And remember those fish know what fish pellets look like and SMELL like; if you want to fish some baits, crawlers will work and the Gulp! and PowerBaits from Berkley smell just like the pellets they were raised on.;)

If you want to fish for some bass, Carter P. has an excellent population of bass in it right now and some of those could be big fish. If you want to fish for catchable rainbows the Grabel ponds may be a little better. If you want some stream fishing for brookies or browns, then the Soldier's Creek Wilderness Area would be hard to beat.

If you go up and fish Soldier's Creek I would again have some nymph patterns, bead-head pheasant tail, hare's ear, and maybe some caddis larvae patterns. You might see some hatches early and late in the day so some small dry fly patterns might work for those fish (e.g. Adams, black gnat, elk-hair caddis). A wooly bugger is a pattern that will almost always catch some fish too.

Hope that helps. If you think of it, give me a report when you get back. Dry one off for me!

Daryl B.

Zach T.
06-25-2008, 01:26 PM
Carter P. Johnson just north of the Fort about 2 miles. Caught lots of trout ice fishing there this past winter.

mark2olson
06-25-2008, 01:53 PM
My wife's family is having a reunion at Ft. Rob this weekend and I'd like to get a bit of fly fishing done. Does anyone have some knowledge of where to go, what to use, etc, while I'm up there? Any help in locating some ponds, lakes, streams would be appreciated. Thanks.

Soldier Creek, in the Soldier Creek Wilderness Area West of the Fort, is a nice little stream to fish on the fly. For the most part, very short, accurate casts from a stealthy position will be the best approach. The vegitation surrounding the stream will be thick this time of year; it will provide you some cover but it will also make casting a challenge. Hike up into the wilderness area if you can, the fishing gets a little better upstream. I've found the Middle Fork to be fairly productive, YMMV. I usually fish a small (18-24) midge larvae, such as a black beauty, on the back of a tandem rig with any of your favorite flies (once again small). You can pick up a brochure at the Park Headquarters.

Sowbelly Creek and Hat Creek are nearby; both offer some excellent fishing but are both on private land. Monroe Creek is also nearby, there is public access at Gilbert-Baker WMA.

On the Fort, there are several lakes, Carter P. Johnson, the Ice House Ponds, and the Grabel Ponds.

Ft. Robinson, IMHO, is one of the most interesting places world-wide. It stood at the intersection of history for many landmark events. The echoes from the events are almost palpable. There is a monument placed near the spot where Crazy Horse was killed, Native Americans place sage and wildflowers on the monument almost daily in tribute. Down the road from the monument is the WWII POW Camp, well worth a visit. Also, stop in and see the Museum, walk the parade grounds and take in all the monuments. The guided tours are excellent and well worth it as are, as others have pointed out, the jeep rides.

kdf5
06-25-2008, 03:34 PM
Ft. Robinson, IMHO, is one of the most interesting places world-wide. It stood at the intersection of history for many landmark events. The echoes from the events are almost palpable. There is a monument placed near the spot where Crazy Horse was killed, Native Americans place sage and wildflowers on the monument almost daily in tribute. Down the road from the monument is the WWII POW Camp, well worth a visit. Also, stop in and see the Museum, walk the parade grounds and take in all the monuments. The guided tours are excellent and well worth it as are, as others have pointed out, the jeep rides.I second that. The connection between the present and the frontier past is stronger at Ft Rob than anywhere else in the USA. Ft Rob even gets mentioned in "Dances With Wolves". It's even cooler since it's so out of the way and such a quiet and peaceful place. We love going there and I recommend it to anyone I can. If you haven't spent time there it's well worth it to travel up there and see it. Toadstool Park and the bison bone bed are awesome as well.